JIS News

Story Highlights

  • The Ministry is providing text books for all students at the primary and secondary levels this year
  • The Ministry published in the newspapers, a list of all the books that are being provided
  • Organizations encouraged to organise the sale of second-hand books

Minister of Education, Hon. Rev. Ronald Thwaites, is encouraging parents and guardians to exercise greater vigilance when shopping for text books.

“I’m appealing to parents to be wise in shopping for books…simple financial prudence would mean that we buy what is necessary to start, and then get others  at a later date,” the Minister said.

He was addressing the NCB Employees Co-operative Credit Union Limited’s 2013 Treasure Chest Solid Goal Grade Six Achievement Test (GSAT) Awards Ceremony, held at the Hotel Four Seasons in Kingston, on August 7.

The Minister informed that as part of efforts to ease the financial cost to parents and guardians to educate children, the Ministry is providing text books for all students at the primary and secondary levels this year, under its text book programme, at a cost of nearly $1 billion.

He noted that last Sunday, August 4, the Ministry published in the newspapers, a list of all the books that are being provided as well as the suggested list of books that may be recommended that are not being provided by the Ministry.

Rev. Thwaites further pointed out that an indicative budget of the cost of these extra books was also published.

The Minister said these arrangements have been made, as it has been recognised that some parents who generally don’t know what is essential, find themselves getting into unnecessary debt, often skimping on important things like lunch money and other necessities, in order to get the books “and the books remain mothballed for an extended period.”

“I’m advising parents and students to consult the list of suggested supplementary books on the Ministry’s website or to check the booklist that appeared in the newspapers,” he said, adding that there are a few other books needed to supplement the Government’s supplied books, “but not a whole lot more.”

Rev. Thwaites further encouraged Parent Teacher Associations and other organizations, such as church groups, to organise the sale of second-hand books.