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JIS News

Story Highlights

  • The National Water Commission (NWC) Customer Census Mapping Project is currently under way in May Pen, Clarendon, where the agency’s representatives are collecting relevant data in order to improve service delivery to existing and potential customers.
  • More than 200,000 persons have already been mapped within the Kingston and St. Andrew region and sections of St. Catherine.
  • NWC Corporate Public Relations Manager, Charles Buchanan, told JIS News that the islandwide exercise, being conducted through the entity’s Geographic Information System (GIS) Department, involves collecting data on the total number of persons served by the Commission in a digital format.

The National Water Commission (NWC) Customer Census Mapping Project is currently under way in May Pen, Clarendon, where the agency’s representatives are collecting relevant data in order to improve service delivery to existing and potential customers.

More than 200,000 persons have already been mapped within the Kingston and St. Andrew region and sections of St. Catherine.

NWC Corporate Public Relations Manager, Charles Buchanan, told JIS News that the islandwide exercise, being conducted through the entity’s Geographic Information System (GIS) Department, involves collecting data on the total number of persons served by the Commission in a digital format.

“(This) will allow us to have information about the exact location of persons who are served and how much demand is expected from different parts of the network,” he noted.

Data gathering is carried out through door-to-door surveys, and each customer is mapped through global positioning system (GPS)-enabled android devices.

The information garnered, Mr. Buchanan said, will be used to identify areas of inadequacies in the NWC’s service system.

He highlighted that the issue of locating customers, especially in rural areas without standard street numbering, poses a challenge and results in operational inefficiencies, which the project is geared at correcting.

As such, he said that the mapping project represents an “important step in using the available technology to modernise our operations and to ensure that we are more effective and efficient in our ability to provide excellent service to our customers”.

Mr. Buchanan is urging members of the public to continue cooperating with representatives from the NWC who are tasked with the collection of data.

“Most of our customers have been quite facilitating and cooperative with our team,” he told JIS News.

Meanwhile, Mr. Buchanan shared that the NWC has implemented over 125 projects across the island, all at various stages of development.

“Each project’s impact and the way it will change the NWC’s mode of operation will vary,” he said.