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Story Highlights

  • The National Solid Waste Management Authority (NSWMA) is to launch a massive clean-up drive aimed at eliminating mosquito breeding sites in major towns across the island.
  • This initiative is part of the Government’s integrated vector control programme to contain the Aedes aegypti mosquito, which transmits the disease.
  • The NSWMA’s Interim Executive Director, Colonel Daniel Pryce, has called for partnership in the clean-up initiative.

The National Solid Waste Management Authority (NSWMA) is to launch a massive clean-up drive aimed at eliminating mosquito breeding sites in major towns across the island.

This initiative is part of the Government’s integrated vector control programme to contain the Aedes aegypti mosquito, which transmits the disease.

The NSWMA’s Interim Executive Director, Colonel Daniel Pryce, has called for partnership in the clean-up initiative.

“I am making an appeal to all the agencies of Government and from the private sector to join with the NSWMA as we seek to clean our towns one by one,” he said, while addressing a press conference on Tuesday (June 16) at Jamaica House.

“If we can work together, if we can harness the resources that we have between the NSWMA, the National Works Agency (NWA), the Jamaica Fire Brigade, the Jamaica Constabulary Force, the Jamaica Defence Force, private sector, private citizens…we can do significant work to clean up the (garbage) that we all see around in gullies, verges and drains,” he contended.

The Interim Executive Director urged communities that are “especially challenged by mosquito nuisance” to work with the NSWMA in addressing this problem, by cleaning up their surroundings.

“Partner with the NSWMA, we are on the right path…let’s join together and keep Jamaica clean,” Colonel Pryce urged.

Symptoms of the Zika virus disease include severe fever, joint and muscle pains, headaches, rashes and conjunctivitis. These symptoms usually appear within three to 12 days after a bite from an infected Aedes aegypti mosquito.