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  • Jamaica, through the National Land Agency (NLA), has led the world in demonstrating the power of technology to benefit society and citizens who don’t have secure land rights.
  • Vice-President of Tax and Accounting Business at Thomson Reuters, Donald Peele, said the NLA has led the way in demonstrating to the world how technology can make a difference through innovation.
  • Citing figures from United Nations Habitat, which estimates that 70 per cent of lands in the developing world have no documented or recognized rights, Mr. Peele said this is a major concern of governments across the world.

Jamaica, through the National Land Agency (NLA), has led the world in demonstrating the power of technology to benefit society and citizens who don’t have secure land rights.

Speaking at a recent JIS ‘Think Tank’, Vice-President of Tax and Accounting Business at Thomson Reuters, Donald Peele, said the NLA has led the way in demonstrating to the world how technology can make a difference through innovation.

“Land is a foundational asset and having just that physical title is important for having economic security and for economic development” Mr. Peele noted.

“Jamaica shows how secure land rights and secure title can help with economic development and demonstrate that to emerging markets around the world to then help other governments help their citizens,” he said.

Citing figures from United Nations Habitat, which estimates that 70 per cent of lands in the developing world have no documented or recognized rights, Mr. Peele said this is a major concern of governments across the world.

“Hundreds of millions of people in the world today live without security that their land is protected under the law and that they will not be asked to leave the land they currently depend on,” he pointed out.

He said this is why Thomson Reuters, which is a US$12.5 billion company, is helping more than 1,000 governments across the world, including Jamaica, to manage lands and in turn collect well needed tax revenues.

Since 2003 Thomson Reuters has been working with the NLA to transform its land titling and registry process. The relationship has seen the company implementing an Aumentum Registry Software at the NLA, which allows the agency to manage land and property information in Jamaica and improve its service delivery to customers.

“A land registration process that once took three weeks now averages two to seven days, thanks to this automated process,” Mr. Peele said.

The NLA has also been able to introduce breakthrough innovations, such as a new digital e-signature to approve land titles. Thomson Reuters says the NLA was the first of its 1,000 international customers to introduce this function in their land titling process.

The Aumentum software is used by more than 1,000 jurisdictions around the world and is used to manage more than 65 million parcels of land which helps Governments throughout the world to bill and collect over US$100 billion in tax revenues annually.

The system is used in countries such as South Africa, Nigeria, Uganda, United States, Egypt, China, Ukraine and Canada.

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