JIS News

Story Highlights

  • Nonpareil Water Supply System in Negril, Westmoreland is scheduled for completion by the end of 2014.
  • The $445 million project is being spearheaded by the NWC.
  • The upgraded facility will improve the water supply to residents of Sheffield, Little London, Nonpareil, etc.

Rehabilitation work on the Nonpareil Water Supply System in Negril, Westmoreland, which is currently underway, is scheduled for completion by the end of 2014.

The $445 million project, being spearheaded by the National Water Commission (NWC), entails the installation of new transmission and distribution pipes and storage tanks, among other inputs.

The upgraded facility, when complete, will improve the water supply to residents of Sheffield, Little London, Nonpareil, Negril, Orange Hill, Mt. Airy, Good Hope, Whitehall and Mount Airy, in Westmoreland.

Water, Land, Environment and Climate Change Minister, Hon. Robert Pickersgill, who toured the project on Friday (August 9), underscored the project’s importance, noting that the water supply has not been as consistent as it should be. This he attributed to technical challenges arising with the system, coupled with aging pipelines, and made worse by drought conditions.

“This project is critical to improving supply in a crucial cross section of the western region which has experienced exponential population growth, and contributes colossally to Jamaica’s tourism, agricultural and manufacturing industries,” Mr. Pickersgill said.

Tourism Minister and Member of Parliament for Western Westmoreland, where the system is located, Hon. Dr. Wykeham McNeill, welcomed the project and expressed satisfaction with the progress of implementation.

“A number of communities…are now going to receive water supply because of this expansion project. It’s a good project which is coming from the Logwood source, so we are expecting a good water supply for the entire area. When you consider the levels of expansion taking place, it’s very necessary for an expansion of this nature. These communities have had levels of water supply, but not enough to meet the needs of the (levels of growth experienced),” Dr. McNeil told JIS News.