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Story Highlights

  • The Ministry of Transport, Works and Housing is moving to recover from motorists, money that is being expended to replace guardrails and other road furniture that are damaged during road crashes.
  • ermanent Secretary in the Ministry, Audrey Sewell, told journalists at a media briefing at the Royalton White Sands Resorts in Trelawny on Wednesday (March 18) that the National Works Agency (NWA) has been mandated to intensify its efforts to file claims on the insurance policies of drivers of vehicles, who damaged road furniture.
  • The Permanent Secretary contended that if motorists, who continue to damage road furniture, are “made to feel the effects in their pockets then maybe they will start taking more care while driving”.

The Ministry of Transport, Works and Housing is moving to recover from motorists, money that is being expended to replace guardrails and other road furniture that are damaged during road crashes.

Permanent Secretary in the Ministry, Audrey Sewell, told journalists at a media briefing at the Royalton White Sands Resorts in Trelawny on Wednesday (March 18) that the National Works Agency (NWA) has been mandated to intensify its efforts to file claims on the insurance policies of drivers of vehicles, who damaged road furniture.

“The National Works Agency has now been mandated…to step up its activities to claim on the insurance of the drivers of these motor vehicles. Recently, the matter was raised at Cabinet because we want to ensure that we have the full support of all concerned,” Mrs. Sewell said.

She noted that the move is part of strategies to ensure that persons comply with the rules governing the safe use of the island’s roads.

Mrs. Sewell pointed out that the replacement of road furniture is putting a financial strain on the Ministry.

“You would appreciate that financial resources are very limited and we are already stretched with the little we have and when they go about damaging the road furniture…they hit out the guardrails, they hit out things on the roads and they get away with it,” she lamented.

The Permanent Secretary contended that if motorists, who continue to damage road furniture, are “made to feel the effects in their pockets then maybe they will start taking more care while driving”.

“Their pockets must feel it because we are sending out the message; we are doing all that we can and they refuse to comply, so we will, as much as possible, ensure that they pay since they will not comply,” she said.