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  • Vector Control Officer at the Westmoreland Health Department, Ryan Morris, says the Aedes Aegypti mosquito population in the parish should decrease with the help of the second cohort of 25 Housing, Opportunity, Production and Employment (HOPE) programme vector control workers.
  • Mr. Morris informed JIS News that the mosquito population had increased with the recent heavy rains, and the HOPE programme workers, who begin their rounds today (October 8), will help in the Department’s vector control efforts.
  • “With more staff we will be able to cover more communities to identify breeding sites that we had missed before,” he said.

Vector Control Officer at the Westmoreland Health Department, Ryan Morris, says the Aedes Aegypti mosquito population in the parish should decrease with the help of the second cohort of 25 Housing, Opportunity, Production and Employment (HOPE) programme vector control workers.

Mr. Morris informed JIS News that the mosquito population had increased with the recent heavy rains, and the HOPE programme workers, who begin their rounds today (October 8), will help in the Department’s vector control efforts.

“With more staff we will be able to cover more communities to identify breeding sites that we had missed before,” he said.

Mr. Morris said he is hoping that participants in the 12-week programme will assist the Department to get the mosquito population down, noting that with the addition of 25 workers, more stringent checks can be done to even more areas in the parish.

He also advised that plans are in place to have thorough once-per-week inspections of typical mosquito breeding sites in various Westmoreland communities, to ensure that the population stays down, as well as to ensure that residents are applying the information given to them by vector control workers.

The Aedes Aegypti mosquito is responsible for the spread of the dengue, Zika and chikungunya viruses.

The second phase of the HOPE programme ends on December 28.