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  • Director, Road Safety Unit in the Ministry of Transport and Mining, Kenute Hare, has reiterated calls by the police for violators of the Road Traffic Act who suspect they have outstanding warrants, to go to the police.
  • On Monday (August 26), Assistant Commissioner of Police (ACP) in charge of the Public Safety and Traffic Enforcement Branch (PSTEB), Bishop Dr. Gary Welsh, said at the inaugural International Symposium on Traffic Crash Investigation and Black Box Analysis at the Caribbean Maritime University (CMU), that there are currently about 40,000 warrants for persons [with traffic offences] and appealed for these persons to go in to the police.
  • “If you suspect that you have a warrant outstanding, we have opened a desk at Lower Elletson Road where we are. You may come in and negotiate when it is you want to be arrested. You have that opportunity to do it now. Come September 1, that will not exist,” ACP Welsh said.

Director, Road Safety Unit in the Ministry of Transport and Mining, Kenute Hare, has reiterated calls by the police for violators of the Road Traffic Act who suspect they have outstanding warrants, to go to the police.

On Monday (August 26), Assistant Commissioner of Police (ACP) in charge of the Public Safety and Traffic Enforcement Branch (PSTEB), Bishop Dr. Gary Welsh, said at the inaugural International Symposium on Traffic Crash Investigation and Black Box Analysis at the Caribbean Maritime University (CMU), that there are currently about 40,000 warrants for persons [with traffic offences] and appealed for these persons to go in to the police.

“If you suspect that you have a warrant outstanding, we have opened a desk at Lower Elletson Road where we are. You may come in and negotiate when it is you want to be arrested. You have that opportunity to do it now. Come September 1, that will not exist,” ACP Welsh said.

Meanwhile, Mr. Hare said it is repeat offenders who are in trouble with the law that are oftentimes involved in road fatalities, and the road safety advocates are trying to prevent future road fatalities.

He noted that since the start of the year, 285 persons have lost their lives because of road crashes and thousands are still suffering from crashes.

“Some will never be able to work again. There are thousands of children who don’t have a father, because of a traffic crash, and there are thousands of children without a mother because of a traffic crash,” he added.

The three-day Symposium is being hosted by the Ministry of Transport and Mining, in partnership with the CMU. It will address the contemporary issues in the traffic crash investigation process, as well as detail the significance of the Event Data Recorders (Black Boxes) in modern motor vehicles.

The Symposium is in accordance with Pillar 5 – Activity 5 of the United Nations Decade of Action for Road Safety (2011- 2020), which posited that there should be a thorough investigation into the crash and application of an effective legal response on road deaths and injuries, and therefore, encourage fair settlements and justice for the bereaved and injured.

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