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  • A month-long series of public consultations is being planned by the Ministry of Mining and Energy (MEM), to introduce the re-engineered Draft National Minerals Policy for public approval.
  • The document is entitled The National Minerals Policy: Fostering Sustainability in Jamaica’s Minerals Industry. The month-long consultations are set to begin on October 26, covering the major parishes where mining operations take place as well as a few others deemed of importance to the sector.
  • The draft policy represents Jamaica’s first minerals policy looking at minerals resources, and seeking to manage them for the country’s benefit.

A month-long series of public consultations is being planned by the Ministry of Mining and Energy (MEM), to introduce the re-engineered Draft National Minerals Policy for public approval.

The document is entitled The National Minerals Policy: Fostering Sustainability in Jamaica’s Minerals Industry. The month-long consultations are set to begin on October 26, covering the major parishes where mining operations take place as well as a few others deemed of importance to the sector.

The draft policy represents Jamaica’s first minerals policy looking at minerals resources, and seeking to manage them for the country’s benefit.

Not only is the draft policy re-engineered and made more efficient, it also incorporates the Mining and Quarrying Sector plan of Vision 2030 Jamaica, the country’s long term National Development Plan.

Principal Director (policy) in the Ministry of Energy and Mining Oral Rainford, told JIS News that the consultations will be focuses in key mining areas, including St. Thomas, St. Catherine, Manchester, Clarendon, and St. Elizabeth.

“These consultations are expected to be very significant and to provide a huge amount of information to guide this very important sector.  It is an amalgamation of two very important documents (the first draft of the policy and the Quarrying Sector plan of Vision 2030 Jamaica), so we are making sure we consult with those persons that are most affected [by mining operations],” he explained.

Mr Rainford stated that the primary intention of the consultations is gathering information and the views and comments of persons who have been affected by or contribute to the minerals industry.

“We will be saying to persons, this is where we are now, this is an improved document.  They will look at it, discuss it and tell us if it relates or represents the things they had [previously] suggested, and whether or not it is a document they will be comfortable with, as it relates to developing the minerals sector,” he said.

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