JIS News

Story Highlights

  • The Ministry of Tourism and Entertainment, in partnership with the Jamaica Environment Trust (JET), has launched a national public education programme geared at encouraging Jamaicans in resort towns to keep their surroundings clean.
  • ‘Nuh Dutty Up Jamaica’, which is being funded by the Tourism Enhancement Fund (TEF) at a cost of $34.5 million, is a year-long initiative aimed at improving the attitudes of most Jamaicans toward their environment.
  • The ‘Nuh Dutty Up Jamaica’ campaign launch was held in conjunction with the release of the 2014 International Coastal Clean-up Jamaica National Report.

The Ministry of Tourism and Entertainment, in partnership with the Jamaica Environment Trust (JET), has launched a national public education programme geared at encouraging Jamaicans in resort towns to keep their surroundings clean.

‘Nuh Dutty Up Jamaica’, which is being funded by the Tourism Enhancement Fund (TEF) at a cost of $34.5 million, is a year-long initiative aimed at improving the attitudes of most Jamaicans toward their environment.

The programme, which is a component of the JET’s ‘Clean Coasts Project’, also seeks to mitigate the harmful impact of garbage on the environment, particularly the coastlines.

Addressing the official launch at the Jamaica Conference Centre in downtown, Kingston on February 4, Tourism Minister, Hon. Dr. Wykeham McNeill, said the government is in full support of the initiative.

“The Ministry of Tourism and Entertainment takes a special interest in these matters, not merely to ensure the sustainability of the industry, but equally to protect and preserve our environment for ourselves as a people,” he emphasised.

“We play an active and vigilant role in environmental protection and preservation, in partnership with governmental and non-governmental agencies, stakeholders and communities,” the Minister added.

For her part, Founder and Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of JET, Diana McCaulay, said Jamaicans must become more proactive in their efforts to protect the environment.

“We need to tackle the problem at its source. Ordinary citizens need to take responsibility for the things that we all use before they enter the waste stream,” she said.

“Clean-ups are a great opportunity to educate people about waste, but ultimately they are reactive. We hope that the Clean Coasts project and the Nuh Dutty Up Jamaica campaign will encourage Jamaicans to find solutions,” the CEO added.

The ‘Nuh Dutty Up Jamaica’ campaign launch was held in conjunction with the release of the 2014 International Coastal Clean-up Jamaica National Report.

The report revealed that some 7,000 volunteers assisted in the clean-up of 113 sites across the island for International Coastal Clean-up Day 2014. This resulted in the collection of over 85,000 pounds of garbage, 80 per cent of which was plastic.

 

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