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    • Director of Minerals Economics in the Ministry of Science, Technology, Energy and Mining, Denis Miller, says the minerals sector is very important to the economy in terms of providing valuable foreign exchange, and as well as creating critical linkages for employment and economic growth.
    • Mr. Miller informed that minerals contributed over 50 per cent in export earnings in 2014, providing over US$7 billion to the Jamaican economy.
    • He said that important industry linkages were created, which provided business for truckers, and heavy equipment rental companies, among others.

    Director of Minerals Economics in the Ministry of Science, Technology, Energy and Mining, Denis Miller, says the minerals sector is very important to the economy in terms of providing valuable foreign exchange, and as well as creating critical linkages for employment and economic growth.

    He was speaking at the Mining Sector Stakeholders Meeting held today (February 17), at the JAMPRO head office on Trafalgar Road in New Kingston.

    Mr. Miller informed that minerals contributed over 50 per cent in export earnings in 2014, providing over US$7 billion to the Jamaican economy.

    He said that important industry linkages were created, which provided business for truckers, and heavy equipment rental companies, among others.

    Mr. Miller said the country’s industrial minerals sector has the potential to grow, particularly with limestone, which he noted Jamaica has in very high quantity and quality.

    Limestone is the new frontier, bringing in the second highest yield after bauxite, he said.

    Citing additional statistics from 2014, Mr. Miller said the marl and fill industry grew exponentially, due largely to the use of the materials in highway construction.

    Limestone, sand and gravel were also profitable, while the value-added commodity cement yielded US$22 billion.

    Meantime, Mr. Miller said that the Government is trying to promote the artisans in the semi-precious stones industry, who use alabaster, clay and marble to create brooches, sculptures and ornaments.