JIS News

Story Highlights

  • A vegetable garden has been established at the Mico Practising Primary and Junior High School, in Kingston, courtesy of the National Environment and Planning Agency (NEPA).
  • It was officially handed over to the institution on Marescaux Road, on Friday, March 6 by the agency.
  • The project will give students and teachers a better grasp of the environment and how it impacts their daily lives.

A vegetable garden has been established at the Mico Practising Primary and Junior High School, in Kingston, courtesy of the National Environment and Planning Agency (NEPA).

It was officially handed over to the institution on Marescaux Road, on Friday, March 6 by the agency.

The project will give students and teachers a better grasp of the environment and how it impacts their daily lives.

Speaking at the ceremony, Director, Environmental Management and Conservation Division at NEPA, Anthony McKenzie, said the project is special, not just for the teachers and students of the school’s Environmental Club, but for members of the Public Education and Corporate Communications Division at NEPA, who have given oversight support for the project since it began in July, 2014.

He noted that a key activity of NEPA is to educate the public, so it was quite fitting when the division opted to work with the Mico Practising Primary and Junior High School to implement a vegetable garden as one element of its environmental education programme for 2014/15.

“Mico was selected as it is in close proximity to the agency. NEPA is proud of this partnership and hopes that through this project, some practical lessons have been taught and learnt about the importance of protecting the environment. No doubt the projects give students and teachers hands-on experience as caregivers of the environment and inculcate good environmental practices in the [participating] students,” Mr. McKenzie said.

The project allows the children to plant pak choy, callaloo and other vegetables, using compost, and to be involved in rain water harvesting. They are also taught to do proper harvesting of the crops.

Mr. McKenzie called on the students to maintain the project, as it offers a practical demonstration of the value of gardening in enriching the curriculum, teaching life skills, and contributing to children’s mental and physical health.

Acting Principal of the school, Geraldine Allen, praised NEPA for their assistance, pointing out that the school, notably the students who benefit from the vegetables used in the breakfast programme, really appreciated the project.

She noted that the knowledge gained from creating compost is currently being used in ‘greening’ of the rest of the school.