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Story Highlights

  • The Lyssons Beach in St. Thomas and the Marking Stone Beach in St. Mary are set for upgrade, following the signing of contracts valued at some $58 million, under the Tourism Enhancement Fund’s (TEF) National Beach Development Programme.
  • Minister of Tourism and Entertainment, Hon. Dr. Wykeham McNeill, speaking at the signing ceremony, hosted at the Ministry’s offices in Kingston on January 20, said this initiative is concrete demonstration of how the tourism industry can have positive impact on ordinary citizens.
  • Under the first phase of a $250 million national project, 15 beaches – at least one in each parish – will be transformed into a quality recreational space for residents and visitors alike.

The Lyssons Beach in St. Thomas and the Marking Stone Beach in St. Mary are set for upgrade, following the signing of contracts valued at some $58 million, under the Tourism Enhancement Fund’s (TEF) National Beach Development Programme.

Minister of Tourism and Entertainment, Hon. Dr. Wykeham McNeill, speaking at the signing ceremony, hosted at the Ministry’s offices in Kingston on January 20, said this initiative is concrete demonstration of how the tourism industry can have positive impact on ordinary citizens.

Under the first phase of a $250 million national project, 15 beaches – at least one in each parish – will be transformed into a quality recreational space for residents and visitors alike.

Lyssons Beach will be upgraded at a cost of $30.5 million and Marking Stone at a cost of $28.1 million.

Among the other beaches under consideration for upgrade in the first phase of the project are: Salem Beach in St. Ann; Great Bay and Fort Charles Beach, in St. Elizabeth; Old Harbour Bay Beach, in St. Catherine; Norman Manley Beach Park, in Westmoreland; Jacob Taylor Beach, in Trelawny; Orchard Beach, in Hanover; Dump Up Beach, in St. James and Lime Cay.

“This underscores once again that tourism is not an enclave sector that benefits only large investors, resorts and attraction owners and the workers in the industry, but should and must have direct and positive impact on the lives of citizens across Jamaica,” Dr. McNeill said.

Over the past two weeks, the Ministry handed over the Burwood Beach, in Trelawny, upgraded at a cost of $28 million, and the Boston Beach, in Portland, upgraded at a cost of  $26.3 million.

Dr. McNeill said the Ministry is ensuring that Jamaicans throughout the island have free access to some of the best beaches equipped with world class beach facilities.

He said the Ministry will continue to work with the Tourism Product Development Company (TPDCo) and the National Environment and Planning Agency (NEPA), to identify and secure leases for additional beaches.