JIS News

Story Highlights

  • Students and tutors at the Norman Manley Law School have lauded the Ministry of Justice for hosting the National Conference on Technology in the Justice Sector, from February 27 to 29.
  • 30Held in collaboration with the Court Administration Division (CAD), the conference explored international trends in e-justice service delivery and how technology facilitates a more effective and efficient system.
  • Final-year student at the Law School, Shanice Green, told JIS News that as an aspiring attorney, the conference came at the right time to help develop her personal understanding of the justice system and the direction in which it is going.

Students and tutors at the Norman Manley Law School have lauded the Ministry of Justice for hosting the National Conference on Technology in the Justice Sector, from February 27 to 29.

30Held in collaboration with the Court Administration Division (CAD), the conference explored international trends in e-justice service delivery and how technology facilitates a more effective and efficient system.

Final-year student at the Law School, Shanice Green, told JIS News that as an aspiring attorney, the conference came at the right time to help develop her personal understanding of the justice system and the direction in which it is going.

“This conference has helped us to understand the justice systems of other jurisdictions and to realise that technology is the way forward. I feel that this is something that will happen over the next few years and I think the concepts are good, especially the e-filing system for the courts, like the ones in New York and Italy. I think a system like that would help with the backlog in the courts locally,” Miss Green said.

The conference had several international speakers, including representatives from Italy, the United Kingdom, European Union and the World Bank as well as regional and local presenters from the Caribbean Court of Justice (CCJ) and the Ministry of Justice.

Second-year-student, Tajeira Douglas, said the conference not only educated her on how technology helps with promoting justice, but addressed some of the issues that come with the pairing of the two areas.

“There are a few concerns that come up with technology and justice, for example, will your rights be protected? But I think we are moving forward in a good direction, and by looking at the other regions in the world, we could possibly model some aspects of our system off those. It’s going to take us some time to get where we need to be, but I think this is a good starting point to open the discussion on how best to move forward as a country to be at the level where we protect the rights of our citizens,” the student said.

Meanwhile, Principal of the Norman Manley Law School, Carol Aina, said once the students become lawyers, they will operate in a technology-driven world and it is important that they have an understanding and appreciation of how both law and technology can work together.

“I think it is important that the systems within the justice sector reflect what is happening globally, and so I am pleased to see some of the changes being discussed by the Minister of Justice and by the Chief Justice, such as e-filing and being able to do case management remotely. It really is a changing world for our graduates and I am glad that we were accommodated at this conference, both tutors and students,” Ms. Aina said.

The three-day technology conference, held at the AC Marriott hotel in Kingston, sought to inform the development of a strategic framework for the digitisation of Jamaica’s justice system.

The conference also aimed at building awareness of the information technology (IT) solutions available to improve the delivery of justice and justice-related services, promote the alignment of IT initiatives with the courts’ business goals and to explore opportunities to re-engineer court processes.

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