JIS News

Story Highlights

  • The operational capacity of the JCF has been bolstered, with the acquisition of 13 motorcycles and two pick-up vans to its fleet.
  • The motorcycles will be deployed to the JCF’s traffic division in the parishes of Kingston, St. James, Manchester, Clarendon, St. Elizabeth, St. Ann and St. Catherine.
  • The motorcycles and pick-ups were purchased from the $300 million allocation by the Government, through the Ministry of National Security.

The operational capacity of the Jamaica Constabulary Force (JCF) has been bolstered, with the acquisition of 13 motorcycles and two pick-up vans to its fleet.

The motorcycles will be deployed to the JCF’s traffic division in the parishes of Kingston, St. James, Manchester, Clarendon, St. Elizabeth, St. Ann and St. Catherine, while the pick-ups will be used to patrol the activities along the North-South corridor of Highway 2000.

Purchased from the $300 million allocation by the Government, through the Ministry of National Security, the motorcycles are the last set of vehicles to be bought for the 2013/2014 financial year. The two pick-ups were purchased by National Road Operating and Constructing Company (NROCC).

The units were handed over during a ceremony at the Police Commissioner’s Office in Kingston, on Monday, March 24.

In his remarks, Minister of National Security, Hon. Peter Bunting, said the latest acquisition is reflective of the Government’s efforts to equip the police to fight crime, noting that they would increase the presence of the police on the roads and enhance their ability to deter crime and traffic offences.

“I’m happy that we have made this investment. It will improve the efficiency of the police traffic department and enhance the safety of those officers who are riding those motorbikes,” he said.

Commissioner of Police, Owen Ellington, said the vehicles will promote more visibility of the officers and ultimately improve driver behaviour on the nation’s roads.

“Last year, we had over 300 fatalities on the road, which turned back a very positive trend and this year we are hoping that we can bring that positive trend back in line, in order to achieve improved road safety. The only way to do that is to effectively enforce the road traffic law,” he emphasised.

In the meantime, Commissioner Ellington pointed out that the presence of the police on the construction sites along the highway discourages extortionists and unruly behaviour by workers.

“That will transition into full-time deployment of highway patrol once the highway becomes operational,” he said.

Managing Director of NROCC, Ivan Anderson, noted that the partnership, which has been on-going for over 10 years, is essential to the operation of the highway.

“Whenever we don’t have (police) presence, we have problems,” he said, adding that in 2011, over 60 incidents occurred on the highways, but once the vehicles were operational, only 15 incidents took place.

The motorcycles are outfitted with lights, sirens, among other features, and bring to 24 the number of such units purchased over the last two years.