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JIS News

Story Highlights

  • The Jamaica Agricultural Society (JAS) is to restructure a training programme offered to farmers at its Denbigh Farm School, in May Pen, Clarendon, to provide certification for JAS members who participate.
  • President of the JAS, Senator Norman Grant, said the administration of the Society’s Clarendon parish office, which is in charge of the school, has been asked to undertake the programme’s restructuring.
  • The farm work component of the Overseas Employment Programme, administered by the Labour and Social Security Ministry, involves periodic attachment to farms, primarily in Canada and the United States.

The Jamaica Agricultural Society (JAS) is to restructure a training programme offered to farmers at its Denbigh Farm School, in May Pen, Clarendon, to provide certification for JAS members who participate.

President of the JAS, Senator Norman Grant, said the administration of the Society’s Clarendon parish office, which is in charge of the school, has been asked to undertake the programme’s restructuring, and to develop a curriculum that will lead to certification.

“We have given a commitment to the Ministry of (Agriculture), Labour and Social Security that the JAS will develop a programme, where we accredit practising farmers, which will help them to qualify for the overseas farm work programme,” he told JIS News, following the JAS’ 120th Annual General Meeting (AGM), held recently at the Denbigh showground.

The farm work component of the Overseas Employment Programme, administered by the Labour and Social Security Ministry, involves periodic attachment to farms, primarily in Canada and the United States.

Senator Grant said the accreditation of members would provide the assurance that farmers selected and recommended for the programme by the JAS, “are going to be giving excellent and productive service.”

While noting that the programme will be offered internally at first, the JAS President advised that consideration will also be given to engaging external stakeholders.

“We have the capacity and what we are going to be doing first is to develop the framework internally. We may, thereafter, have discussions with HEART Trust/NTA…to see if we can collaborate with them,” he added.

Meanwhile, Senator Grant advised that the JAS is midway into implementing another farmers’ training programme, for which the organization was given $14 million by the Ministry.

The programme, which commenced in January, is being facilitated under a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) signed by both parties to train 1,500 farmers in poultry, pig and small ruminants management, over a period of 12 months.

Senator Grant said the programme is designed to provide participants with “a new approach to agriculture,” adding that it has been “going very well.”