Jamaicans Encouraged to Use Crime Stop

Photo: Peta Gay Rowe Regional Chairman of Crime Stoppers International (CSI), Alex McDonald (right), converses with Executive Director, National Integrity Action (NIA), Professor Trevor Munroe, after a presentation on corruption and crime at the recently held Association of Caribbean Commissioners of Police (ACCP) conference hosted by the Jamaica Constabulary Force (JCF) in Montego Bay, St James.

Story Highlights

  • Crime Stoppers International (CSI) is imploring Jamaicans to make use of Crime Stop to report criminal activity in their community.
  • Speaking with JIS News at the recent Association of Caribbean Commissioners of Police (ACCP) conference hosted by the Jamaica Constabulary Force (JCF) in Montego Bay, Regional Chairman of CSI, Alex MacDonald said that Crime Stop, because of the anonymity it provides, is a key arsenal in the fight against crime.
  • “Crime Stoppers … throughout the Caribbean and other parts of the world, has been in existence for over 40 years, and here in Jamaica it’s over 25 years and not once has anybody been identified. This demonstrates how sound and safe reporting to Crime Stop is,” Mr. MacDonald said.

Crime Stoppers International (CSI) is imploring Jamaicans to make use of Crime Stop to report criminal activity in their community.

Speaking with JIS News at the recent Association of Caribbean Commissioners of Police (ACCP) conference hosted by the Jamaica Constabulary Force (JCF) in Montego Bay, Regional Chairman of CSI, Alex MacDonald said that Crime Stop, because of the anonymity it provides, is a key arsenal in the fight against crime.

He assured that the platform is safe and the information provided is confidential, and so persons should have no fear in making reports.

“Crime Stoppers … throughout the Caribbean and other parts of the world, has been in existence for over 40 years, and here in Jamaica it’s over 25 years and not once has anybody been identified. This demonstrates how sound and safe reporting to Crime Stop is,” Mr. MacDonald said.

He noted that callers are eligible to receive a cash reward if the information given leads to an arrest, charge or prosecution.

“The informant is completely anonymous; they will never ask your name or telephone number. They will just take your information and pass it on to law enforcement, whether its police, customs or immigration,” he pointed out.

“No one else will know. It’s all done by a number (no names to trace) and it is completely safe – you choose how you want to collect your reward,” he added.

Mr. MacDonald pointed out that Crime Stop is not operated by the police, and the system relies on volunteer directors and contributions from the private sector.

“It is not a JCF (Jamaica Constabulary Force) entity; our organisation is run by civilians. Their purpose in the community is to help people who are less able to speak to the police out of fear – to help make their reports with peace of mind,” he said.

Mr. MacDonald told JIS News that the programme allows for accountability, and when the information is forwarded to law enforcement, they have to give a report as to how it was utilised.

“So, they have to report back to Crime Stoppers to say that they acted on the data, or they used the information as a tool to put together a case for future reference. So every piece of data must be acknowledged,” he said.

Mr. MacDonald called for all well-thinking Jamaicans to make use of the programme.

“If you want to see a better Jamaica, a crime-free Jamaica or a Jamaica where businesses boom, then start dialing and use the Crime Stop programme,” he urged.

“Security in our neighborhoods is very important for everyone whether you are the single mother, who is trying to bring up her kids, or the business person who is trying to run a small business,” he said.

Crime Stop has been operating in Jamaica since 1989. Anonymous reports to the programme have resulted in the arrest of over 2,200 individuals, seizure of over $560 million worth of illegal drugs and the recovery of some $200 million worth of stolen property.

JIS Social