JIS News

Story Highlights

  • Twenty-eight year-old Georgina Singh is proof of the successful and enduring diplomatic relationship existing between Jamaica and Mexico, over the last 50 years.
  • Ms. Singh, a recipient of the 2005 Call for Scholarships from the Mexican Government to foreigners, is an example of the value both countries place on tertiary education.
  • In 2006 and at age 17, Ms. Singh journeyed to Mexico to pursue an undergraduate degree in Government and Political Studies, majoring in Public Management at the University of Guadalajara in the State of Jalisco.

Twenty-eight year-old Georgina Singh is proof of the successful and enduring diplomatic relationship existing between Jamaica and Mexico, over the last 50 years.

Ms. Singh, a recipient of the 2005 Call for Scholarships from the Mexican Government to foreigners, is an example of the value both countries place on tertiary education.

In 2006 and at age 17, Ms. Singh journeyed to Mexico to pursue an undergraduate degree in Government and Political Studies, majoring in Public Management at the University of Guadalajara in the State of Jalisco.

Recounting her initial exposure to a new environment, Ms. Singh said a bag her mother packed containing biscuits and other goodies, came in handy during some difficult moments.

Tours of Mexico and a behind the scenes look at aspects of Government, as a result of an internship, were among the highlights of her stay while studying in the Mesoamerican country.

Formative school lessons in Spanish in Jamaica were a big help.

“By then I could function very well in reading and writing,” said the St. Andrew High School for Girls alumna in a JIS News interview. She had obtained a grade one in the Caribbean Examination Council (CXC) Spanish examinations.

Sharing similarities between Jamaica and Mexico, Ms. Singh stated that both countries enjoy a love for spicy foods.

“I think they would use it more than us, because even in sweets and fruits they tend to use chili powder. They have a drink called Agua de Jamaica (Hibiscus Tea), which reminded me of Sorrel,” she said. A love for sports is another similarity both countries enjoy.

“Mexico’s culture is also diverse like ours. There are several indigenous groups in Mexico that constitutes the heart of their culture,” said the honour graduate.

During Ms. Singh’s stay in Mexico, support from fellow Jamaicans and other Caribbean friends, were keys to overcoming homesickness.

Ms. Singh, who is an Assistant to the Mexican Ambassador to Jamaica, Her Excellency, Cecilia Jaber, is encouraging Jamaicans to take up a Mexican scholarship. Entries into the scholarship programme are to open shortly.

She believes that the scholarship programme will deepen ties between Jamaica and Mexico.

“The Mexican Government has been a close partner of Jamaica and they have been very supportive of Jamaica’s effort to provide persons with opportunities for tertiary education. Scholarship opportunities fall under the Co-operation Programme of the Mexican Government,” she stated.

March 18 marked 50 years of diplomatic relations between the two countries.

Throughout this year, collaborative efforts between both countries Foreign Ministries and Embassies will result in a number of photo and culinary exhibitions, craft displays and cultural festivals. Jamaica and Mexico will also hold a meeting of the Jamaica/Mexico Bi-National Commission in Mexico City, in May 2016.