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  • The National Meteorological Service has upgraded Jamaica’s Tropical Storm Watch classification to a Warning.
  • He indicated that the Met Service has consulted with the National Hurricane Centre (NHC) in Miami, “and they are persistent in the view that we need to be moving in this general (tropical storm warning classification) direction.”
  • The Meteorological Service will continue to monitor the Tropical Wave and provide updates on its development.

The National Meteorological Service has upgraded Jamaica’s Tropical Storm Watch classification to a Warning.

This was disclosed by Director of the Meteorological Service Division in the Ministry of Economic Growth and Job Creation, Evan Thompson, during a press briefing at the Office of the Prime Minister (OPM), today (August 1).

Mr. Thompson said based on developments with the severe weather system that threatens the island, “it is almost now a sure deal that there will be some tropical storm conditions that will be experienced by the island in some way or another.”

He indicated that the Met Service has consulted with the National Hurricane Centre (NHC) in Miami, “and they are persistent in the view that we need to be moving in this general (tropical storm warning classification) direction.”

A Met Service bulletin advised that tropical storm conditions, including possible sustained wind speeds of 34 to 63 knots or 63 to118 kilometres per hour, are expected to affect Jamaica within 36 hours or less.

The strong Tropical Wave, which is coursing across the central Caribbean, has moved within 385 kilometres (240 miles) east-southeast of Kingston, Jamaica.

Heavy showers and thunderstorms associated with the system remain organized and a possible deterioration in weather conditions could influence the formation of a tropical storm tonight.

While noting that the NHC continues to refer to the system as a Tropical Wave, Mr. Thompson said based on features of the satellite imagery, they would have determined that the system has developed beyond this stage.

“However, unless there is confirmed closed circulation of the wind in the lower levels of the atmosphere, it cannot be classified as a tropical cyclone,” Mr. Thompson explained.

As such, he said the Centre “cannot issue advisories on these systems or indicate track guidance…and hence continues to refer to it as a tropical wave.”

Mr. Thompson further advised that a United States Air Force Reserve Reconnaissance Aircraft was sent to investigate the system.

He said once the data acquired confirms a closed circulation, the NHC will upgrade tropical wave to a tropical storm.

The Meteorological Service will continue to monitor the Tropical Wave and provide updates on its development.