JIS News

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  • Jamaica is taking advantage of critical environmental and atmospheric information and research in order to strengthen the country’s capacity to mitigate the effects of hazards associated with climate change.
  • Minister of Water, Land, Environment and Climate Change, Hon. Robert Pickersgill, said with Jamaica listed as having the second highest economic risk to hazards, the country’s preparedness and action “must be based on sound science and partnerships at all levels, and with all sectors.”
  • He noted that experts at the Meteorological Service and Climate Change Division are a critical part of the preparedness process.

Jamaica is taking advantage of critical environmental and atmospheric information and research in order to strengthen the country’s capacity to mitigate the effects of hazards associated with climate change.

Minister of Water, Land, Environment and Climate Change, Hon. Robert Pickersgill, said with Jamaica listed as having the second highest economic risk to hazards, the country’s preparedness and action “must be based on sound science and partnerships at all levels, and with all sectors.”

“There is little doubt that future strategies to deal with climate change will depend upon sound knowledge of past and present climate, in our nation, and in our region,” the Minister said in a speech delivered by State Minister in the Ministry, Hon. Ian Hayles, at a World Metrology Day function held on March 23 at the University of the West Indies, Mona Campus.

“Decisions on adaptation and mitigation must be informed by our understanding of global climate system, and our ability to project future climate through continued and improved monitoring and research,” the Minister added.

He noted that experts at the Meteorological Service and Climate Change Division are a critical part of the preparedness process. These professionals, he said, “have been at the forefront of regional and international climate change negations, to further the agenda of Jamaica and the region, in climate resilience and mitigation.”

He informed that partnerships have also been forged with other Government entities, such as the Planning Institute of Jamaica, as well as the international donor agencies, “that are assisting us in charting the sustainable future that we want for our children, and their children, and helping us to realise our Vision 2030 goal.”

The Inter-American Development Bank (IDB)-sponsored event included a public lecture, delivered by Jamaican born and international consulting scientist, Dr. Arlene Laing.

She highlighted the latest trends in metrology, and offered advice for planning to meet the various changes affecting states that are prone to disasters.