JIS News

Story Highlights

  • Jamaica Pulse, the first major exhibition of Jamaican visual art to be held in the United Kingdom, opened on Friday (June 24) in Bristol.
  • The four-month exhibition is being staged by the Royal West of England Academy (RWA), and showcases the diversity of Jamaican art, ranging from contemporary pieces to the works of veteran artists such as Albert Huie, George Rodney and Mallica ‘Kapo’ Reynolds.
  • The exhibition involves partnership with the High Commission and is supported by Arts Council England and the Art Fund.

Jamaica Pulse, the first major exhibition of Jamaican visual art to be held in the United Kingdom, opened on Friday (June 24) in Bristol.

The four-month exhibition is being staged by the Royal West of England Academy (RWA), and showcases the diversity of Jamaican art, ranging from contemporary pieces to the works of veteran artists such as Albert Huie, George Rodney and Mallica ‘Kapo’ Reynolds.

Jamaica’s Acting High Commissioner to the UK, Diedre Mills, who was special guest at the official launch, said the exhibition was significant for Jamaican art.

She expressed pleasure that this aspect of the Jamaican culture was receiving such wide exposure and acclaim.  “This facet of the Jamaica experience is an integral part of our history and heritage and also helps to define who we are as a people,” she said.

Mrs. Mills also spoke about the significance of the event taking place in Bristol, which has a historic link with persons of Jamaican, Caribbean and African descent.

Newly elected Mayor of Bristol, Marvin Rees, who declared the display open saidBristol is a vibrant and richly diverse city, making it a great host for this exhibition.

“I am very pleased that this is a UK first and that Bristol is hosting Jamaican Pulse. I hope it will attract interest, generate conversation and enrich our understanding of Jamaican art and culture, along with its relevance to many Bristol people,” said Mr. Rees, who is of Jamaican descent.

The works on show include paintings, sculptures, photography, textiles and moving images from a number of public and private collections, including the Jamaican High Commission in London and The National Gallery of Jamaica.

The exhibition involves partnership with the High Commission and is supported by Arts Council England and the Art Fund.

It is co-curated by Kat Anderson and Graeme Mortimer Evelyn on behalf of the RWA. Both curators are of Jamaican heritage.

Jamaican Pulse, which will run until September, will be accompanied by a range of educational and cultural programmes at the RWA and other venues across Bristol, including a satellite programme at The Bluecoat, Liverpool, which is a centre for Contemporary Arts.

On Independence Day, August 6, Bristol Councillor and artist, Cleo Lake, will conduct a tour of the display, followed by a walk to St. Pauls, which is the spiritual home of Bristol’s Jamaican community.

The walk will explore the historic connections between the city and Jamaica and will include performances, music and poetry.

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