JIS News

Story Highlights

  • The Government, through the Maritime Authority of Jamaica (MAJ), will host the second International Bunker Conference from September 10 to 12, at the Iberostar Suites Hotel in Rose Hall, St. James.
  • This will be done in collaboration with the International Bunker Industry Association (IBIA).
  • In an interview with JIS News, Director General of the MAJ, Rear Admiral Peter Brady, explained that the first conference was held in April 2018 to discuss a new requirement by the International Maritime Organisation (IMO) to cap the sulphur content in ship fuel.

The Government, through the Maritime Authority of Jamaica (MAJ), will host the second International Bunker Conference from September 10 to 12, at the Iberostar Suites Hotel in Rose Hall, St. James.

This will be done in collaboration with the International Bunker Industry Association (IBIA).

In an interview with JIS News, Director General of the MAJ, Rear Admiral Peter Brady, explained that the first conference was held in April 2018 to discuss a new requirement by the International Maritime Organisation (IMO) to cap the sulphur content in ship fuel.

“From the feedback of the participants, it was decided that it was a very successful conference,” he said, adding that the fuel cap will be implemented on January 1, 2020.

It is against this background, he said, that the hosts, the MAJ and IBIA, decided to renew their partnership and host a similar conference at the urging of the participants.

“We, therefore, decided to go ahead and host the Second MAJ/IBIA International Bunkering Conference this year, just before the introduction of the new legislation,” he explained.

He informed that Minister of Transport and Mining, Hon. Robert Montague, will deliver the keynote speech, “setting the stage for the Conference on Wednesday when it begins in earnest”.

According to Rear Admiral Brady, the conference will look at factors that affect the industry as it seeks to bring itself in line with the new International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships (MARPOL) legislation.

“We want to address these matters so that the maritime industry can be adequately prepared and we know how to enter this new era of fuels with as little disruption as possible,” he said.

Rear Admiral Bailey said that in the 18 months since the first conference, Jamaica is well advanced in terms of the amendments to the legislation.

“The Government is keen that we observe all of the requirements of the legislation as it affects climate action, and we are hoping that it will get into the Parliament by early next year,” he explained.

The Director General pointed out that although it is largely a regional conference, it will also be attended by some international participants, who will share their expertise.

“We are looking at a number of places that have already started to produce and supply this low-sulphur fuel and it is good to learn from the experience of others, so that on January 1, we would be in better stead, having been aware of mistakes and the practices that have been developed by other countries and other bunker suppliers around the world,” he said.

“We want to try and get the best available information and the best available tuition on how to approach this new era, because it is going to change how a lot of things are done in the world, not only in terms of supply but also when ships come to port. Those ships are going to have to be checked to ensure that they are, in fact, using compliant fuel,” the Director General said.

He informed that this is will be one of the duties that the MAJ assigns to its Port State Control Officers.

“They board ships that call at our ports and do these checks for compliance. It is really a very timely event and we are happy that we are able to host it,” he said.