Jamaica Fire Brigade Gets Rescue Equipment

Photo: JIS Photographer Commissioner, Jamaica Fire Brigade, Laurie Williams (right), examines a Hydraulic cutter during a handing over ceremony at the York Park Fire Station in Kingston, on August 22. Others sharing in the moment (from left) are: Instructor and Representative from Hurst, Paul Felegy and Assistant Commissioner, Raymond Spencer. The rescue tools, valued at approximately US$35,000, were donated by ABC Electrical Sales. They include a combination of cutting and spreading tools, stabilizers and rams, which are used to assist with the extrication of casualties during an accident.

Story Highlights

  • Rescue tools valued at approximately US$35,000
  • The rescue equipment,include a combination of cutting and spreading tools
  • The equipment will be located at the York Park Fire Station

The Jamaica Fire Brigade has received rescue tools valued at approximately US$35,000, as part of efforts to boost its operations.

More popularly called ‘jaws of life’, the rescue equipment, manufactured by Hurst, include a combination of cutting and spreading tools, stabilizers and rams, which are used to assist with the extrication of casualties during an accident.

The equipment will be located at the York Park Fire Station and will serve the Kingston and St. Andrew Metropolitan Area. They were donated by ABC Electrical Sales.

In an interview with JIS News, following the handing over ceremony at the York Park Fire Station in Kingston, on August 22, Commissioner, Laurie Williams, informed that several fire-fighters have received training to operate the tools.

He noted that they will assist in enhancing the capabilities of the fire-fighters as well as bring a certain degree of professionalism to the activities that are conducted by members of the Brigade.

Expressing gratitude for the donation, Commissioner Williams said the “top of the line” equipment will allow the officers to extricate casualties from vehicles whenever the need arises.

Instructor and representative from Hurst, Paul Felegy, said the fire-fighters who were trained to use the state-of- the-art equipment, were appreciative of the device and eager to learn.

He informed that it will assist them in carrying out their duties more efficiently. “It eliminates having an external power unit and hoses to give you more freedom to do your job and do your extrication and also have a (quieter) atmosphere for better communication,” he said.

The first batch of 12 fire-fighters who have been trained to operate the equipment will, over time, train other members to use the tools.

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