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JIS News

Story Highlights

  • A workshop geared at sensitising parents and guardians of students athletes about the anti-doping regulations was held yesterday (April 6) at Jamaica College in Kingston.
  • At the workshop, held under the theme ‘Preventing Doping: Parents Reach One, Teach One’, participants discussed Jamaica’s anti-doping programme, the functions and responsibilities of JADCO, ethics, the doping control process and the health consequences of doping.
  • Chairman of JADCO, Alexander Williams, informed that the violation of anti-doping rules and making decisions that are contrary to the values associated with fair play in sport, can lead to loss of income, reputation and a host of other negative consequences.

A workshop geared at sensitising parents and guardians of students athletes about the anti-doping regulations was held yesterday (April 6) at Jamaica College in Kingston.

It was the first in a series of five anti-doping sessions being organised by the Jamaica Anti-Doping Commission (JADCO) in collaboration with the National Parent-Teacher Association of Jamaica (NPTAJ).

The project is funded by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO).

At the workshop, held under the theme ‘Preventing Doping: Parents Reach One, Teach One’, participants discussed Jamaica’s anti-doping programme, the functions and responsibilities of JADCO, ethics, the doping control process and the health consequences of doping.

In an interview with JIS News, President of the NPTAJ, Everton Hannam, said it is important that parents are cognisant of the various regulations in light of the “positive engagement of our students and the rise of Jamaica in sport, particularly in athletics and sprinting”.

He said that parents without knowledge can administer certain medications containing ingredients that are on the World Anti-Doping Agency’s (WADA) prohibited list.

“Therefore, this educational workshop is seen as an effort to inform and to educate parents about that process, about possible items, about possible medications that they might be giving to their children that could be on the WADA anti-doping ban,” he pointed out.

Mr. Hannam is imploring parents and guardians to participate in the various fora that will be held across the island.

The venues are Church Teachers’ College in Manchester, May 4; Annotto Bay Secondary School in St. Mary on May 18; William Knibb High School in Trelawny on June 22; Mount Alvernia High School in St. James on June 29; and the G.C. Foster College in St. Catherine on July 6.

Mr. Hannam said that persons can contact the NPTAJ at 612-5707 or visit the JADCO website, www.jadco.gov.jm to seek further information about the workshops.

“Ensure that you participate in these fora, so that you can become fully informed about what are some of the dos and don’ts of anti-doping, and make sure that brand Jamaica’s name is protected,” he urged.

Chairman of JADCO, Alexander Williams, informed that the violation of anti-doping rules and making decisions that are contrary to the values associated with fair play in sport can lead to loss of income, reputation and a host of other negative consequences.

“It is important that even while we seek to educate our athletes at all levels, we maintain a relationship with you the parents and other members of their support team to provide you with the tools to assist in their development,” he noted.

Mr. Williams said that ignorance of the law is no excuse for breaking the rules, and parents must seek to gain knowledge and join the fight against doping in sport.