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Story Highlights

  • The Kingston Access Points will be located at the Duhaney Park Information Centre at 121 Baldwin Crescent in Duhaney Park, and at 13 Langston Road in McGregor Gardens.
  • The establishment of CAPs is as an innovative way to provide computer access to all citizens.
  • The initiative is also a means of stimulating entrepreneurship, as well as opening the lines of communication between citizens and Government.

Residents of inner-city communities in Kingston and St. James, are to benefit from four new Community Access Points (CAPs).

The Kingston Access Points will be located at the Duhaney Park Information Centre at 121 Baldwin Crescent in Duhaney Park, and at 13 Langston Road in McGregor Gardens.

In St. James a third CAP will be located at the Burchell Baptist Church at the corner of Market and King Streets, while the fourth will be located at the Albion Community Resource Centre in Albion on the outskirts of Montego Bay.

The establishment of CAPs is as an innovative way to provide computer access to all citizens. The initiative is also a means of stimulating entrepreneurship, as well as opening the lines of communication between citizens and Government.

Minister of State in the Ministry of Science,Technology, Energy and Mining Hon. Julian Robinson who made the disclosure at a recent JIS Think Tank, stated that more than 150 CAPs have been rolled out at schools, post offices, community centres, and other central locations across the island. He said the Access Points have been providing a valuable service to the communities.

“CAPs are essentially an Internet café. It can be at a church or community centre. It’s generally where a Community Based Organisation (CBO) would make a request of the USF [Universal Service Fund]. Once they have a facility and the management team in place then the USF provides the computers and the connectivity and they manage the facility,” he explained.

CAPs are a viable solution to bridging the digital divide that leaves many Jamaicans without access to the wealth of information available via the Internet.

The CAPs are integrating available computer technologies that enable users to explore possibilities in such areas as music and video production, creative writing, and publishing

According to the State Minister, establishing the over 150 CAPs will eventually empower constituents with the tools to communicate, research, and explore entrepreneurial alternatives, which will boost business activities, and provide opportunities for e-commerce throughout communities.

Minister Robinson noted that the CAPs were part of a broader range of projects being undertaken by the government including, an island-wide Broad-band network where schools, libraries and post offices are outfitted with high-speed Internet, financed by the USF.

He also pointed out that over 200 computer laboratories have been created in schools across the country through the e-Learning initiative, ‘Tablets in Schools’ where 30,000 tablet computers will be placed in 37 schools, and teachers trained in computer programmes.

The Minister further reiterated the government’s commitment to facilitating information and communication technology access to as many persons as possible, noting that this is imperative in an era of “rapidly changing technological advances”.

The services provided at these CAPs are free to users or in some cases, provided at a minimal cost.