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    The Heart Foundation of Jamaica (HFJ) is providing incentives for organisations to send employees to be trained in Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) during CPR Week 2020.

    Speaking at a JIS Think Tank on Thursday (October 22), Senior Manager, Marketing and Business Development at the HFJ, Nola Phillpotts-Brown, said it is part of the thrust to get as many persons as possible trained in CPR.

    She pointed out that if companies send 20 persons for training, they will receive some medical services free of cost.

    “We have been encouraging companies to have their staff trained in CPR and First Aid. If they train, we will provide medical services to those persons who are in the training session; so we would be providing 20 persons with free blood pressure and blood sugar checks,” Mrs. Phillpotts-Brown said.

    She said that this is expected to encourage employers to have their staff trained as soon as possible. CPR Week, which is usually observed during the month of June, was postponed because of the COVID-19 pandemic.

    It is being observed from October 26 to 31 under the theme ‘Surviving with CPR’.

    Mrs. Phillpotts-Brown explained that the theme was chosen based on the recognition that more persons need to be aware of the techniques and to learn how to do CPR.

    She issued a reminder that CPR training is available in-house at the Beechwood Avenue offices.

    “We have been asking persons who come in to do a regular medical service to consider doing our Family and Friends CPR Course,” Mrs. Phillpotts-Brown said.

    CPR Week will culminate with a Family and Friends CPR training on Saturday, October 31, from 9:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m.

    “We will also be open to the public, so we will have patients here who will be doing the regular medical services that we provide, but we will be doing the CPR course in our Training Department,” she explained.

    The Senior Marketing and Business Development Manager explained that the Heart Foundation offers CPR training for various categories of persons.

    “We have courses that are designed for non-medical persons and courses for medical persons, so if you have an interest in being trained in CPR, you don’t have to worry that you are not medical and perhaps there is none for you,” Mrs. Phillpotts-Brown said.

    “We have the Heart Saver Course for persons who are non-medical, so you could be caregivers or you could work in a nursery or a children’s home. You may be an employee of an organisation and want to know how to respond if someone were to suddenly fall and lose consciousness in front of you,” she said, adding that the person who completed the course would receive a two-year certification.

    Mrs. Phillpotts-Brown pointed out that there is also a course called Basic Life Support for persons who work in the medical profession and need to know how to respond as a requirement of the job.

    The HFJ also provides a course for paediatricians called Paediatric Advanced Life Support (PALS) as well as the Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) for medical practitioners.

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