Incandescent Traffic Signals Being Replaced With Energy Saving LAMPS


The Ministry of Transport and Works, through the Road Maintenance Fund, is replacing all incandescent traffic signals across the island with Light Emitting Diode (LED) lamps.

Minister of Transport and Works, Hon. Michael Henry (left), in discussion with Operations Manager of the Traffic Management Unit, National Works Agency, Michael Saunderson regarding Light Emitting Diode (LED) traffic signal lamps, which are to replace incandescent traffic signals across the island. Occasion was a contract signing ceremony at the Ministry’s Maxfield Avenue offices in Kingston, on September 3.

The 1,990 LED lamps, which will be installed at a cost of $14 million, are expected to improve road safety and reduce the electricity needed to operate the island’s traffic signals.
Speaking at a contract signing ceremony at the Ministry’s Maxfield Avenue offices in Kingston, on September 3, Minister of Transport and Works, Hon. Michael Henry, informed that the conversion process had started, with over 40 per cent of the traffic signals currently using LED lamps.
“The remaining 60 per cent of traffic signals will be converted over the next 12 months,” he informed.
Mr. Henry noted that the two main advantages of using the LED lamps are: low energy usage, ranging between 10 watts and 22 watts, compared with 100-watt incandescent lamps; and longer life (seven to 10 years), compared with three months for incandescent lamps.
Pointing to some of the other benefits to be derived from the installation of these lights, Mr. Henry said the LED lamps were brighter when compared with incandescent lamps, which enhances intersection safety.

Operations Manager of the Traffic Management Unit, National Works Agency, Michael Saunderson explaining the benefits of Light Emitting Diode (LED) traffic signal lamps, at a contract signing ceremony at the Ministry’s Maxfield Avenue offices in Kingston on September 3. The Ministry of Transport and Works, through the Road Maintenance Fund will, over the next 12 months, replace all incandescent traffic signals across the island with LED lamps.

“Unlike incandescent lamps with a single filament, LED lamps will consist of a matrix of several dozen LEDs and will continue to function even if a few of the LEDs stop working,” he said.
The Minister noted that in case of power outage, there would be a battery backup system at critical intersections.
He informed that the remaining lamps, which are expected in the island by the end of this month, would reduce the electrical bill significantly.
“The programme will focus on intersections with an average monthly bill in excess of $25,000. So, we are expecting to reduce that from $25,000 by 87 per cent,” he said.
Chief Executive Officer, National Works Agency, Patrick Wong, said the conversion of street lights to LED lamps would also be explored over time in an effort to reduce electricity cost.

Minister of Transport and Works, Hon. Michael Henry (second right); Executive Director, Road Maintenance Fund, Clement Watson (right); Chief Executive Officer, National Works Agency, Patrick Wong (second left) and Managing Director, Machinery Services Limited, Paul Morgan, sign contract for the conversion of incandescent traffic signals to Light Emitting Diode (LED) lamps, at a contract signing ceremony at the Ministry’s Maxfield Avenue offices in Kingston, on September 3.

“This technology can also be applied to street lights. We will be doing a pilot project to test this out, and then in collaboration with the Department of Local Government, to see if we can develop a programme to implement this, as it would lead to tremendous savings,” he said.
Machinery and Services Limited will be carrying out the installation works.
There are currently over 200 traffic signals islandwide, which are operational over 95 per cent of the time.

JIS Social