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JIS News

Story Highlights

  • Residents of Majesty Gardens, in St. Andrew, are currently going through the selection process for some 48 apartment units.
  • The houses have been built by the National Housing Trust (NHT), under the Planning Institute of Jamaica (PIOJ) co-ordinated Community Renewal Programme (CRP).
  • President of the Majesty Gardens Benevolent Society, Wayne Bernard, We welcome the project with open arms. Education is one of the community’s top priorities now

Residents of  Majesty Gardens, in St. Andrew, are currently going through the selection process for some 48 apartment units, which have been built by the National Housing Trust (NHT), under the Planning Institute of Jamaica (PIOJ) co-ordinated Community Renewal Programme (CRP), with input from other agencies.

“To get a real impact and a change for the community, we started off with a working group that looked at transforming the entire community, and we have built 48 apartment units at one section of the community, and we are now to complete the remaining 400,”  stated Technical Specialist for Youth Development and Social Transformation with the  CRP project, Sherrian Gray, while speaking at a Jamaica Information Service (JIS) ‘Think Tank’, on October 8 at the agency’s head office in Kingston.

“Not all communities will require housing, but some do. Our main aim is social transformation for all the communities,”  she said.

Welcoming the houses, and other social programmes in the community, President of the Majesty Gardens Benevolent Society, Wayne Bernard, told JIS News that the area is receiving renewal, with educational and skills training programmes and the residents  preparing to equip themselves, focusing on a vision to build the community, empower themselves and assume worthwhile positions in the society.

“We welcome the project with open arms. Education is one of the community’s top priorities now…to educate the community people to higher levels, so that we can meet the demand of what is to come, and get to operate within society at the highest levels,” Mr. Bernard said.

Meanwhile, Miss Gray pointed out that the CRP is working in 100 communities that are classified as vulnerable and volatile, in the parishes of St. James, St. Catherine, Clarendon, and Kingston and St. Andrew. She said the programme is helping to shape the physical look of the areas, and address the economic development and governance structures of the communities.

“Physical transformation of the communities deals with housing, roads, water supply and youth development. We look at employment for youth, social transformation, parenting, family structures and attitudinal changes. We also look at governance elements in the communities, safety and security, and the interaction between the Police and the citizens,” she said.

The CRP is targeting parishes that have experienced the highest murder rates over the last decade. Its primary role is to provide a co-ordinating framework for the implementation of a holistic range of interventions that enable citizens to live full and satisfied lives in safe and just communities.