Health Ministry Gets Fogging Machines From Food For The Poor

Photo: Dave Reid Permanent Secretary in the Ministry of Health, Dr. Kevin Harvey (second left) discusses how a mosquito fogging machine is operated with (from third right) Acting Chief Medical Officer (CMO) in the Ministry of Health, Dr. Winston De La Haye, and Executive Director, Food for the Poor (FFP) Jamaica, David Mair. Looking on is Director, Environmental Health in the Ministry, Everton Baker. Occasion was a presentation ceremony for medication and mosquito fogging machines valued at $5.7 million at the FFP offices in St. Catherine. The FFP donated 6,000 bottles of paracetamol tablets and 19 portable mosquito foggers to the Ministry.

Story Highlights

  • The Ministry of Health has received a donation of medication and mosquito fogging machines, valued at $5.7 million, from Food for the Poor (FFP) Jamaica.
  • The 6,000 bottles of paracetamol tablets and 19 portable foggers will assist the Government in its continued fight against the spread of mosquito-borne illnesses, such as the Zika Virus (ZikV).
  • The illness is usually mild with symptoms lasting from several days to a week.

The Ministry of Health has received a donation of medication and mosquito fogging machines, valued at $5.7 million, from Food for the Poor (FFP) Jamaica.

The 6,000 bottles of paracetamol tablets and 19 portable foggers will assist the Government in its continued fight against the spread of mosquito-borne illnesses, such as the Zika Virus (ZikV).

The items were handed over during a ceremony held at the FFP offices, in St. Catherine, today (February 19).

Addressing the ceremony, Permanent Secretary in the Ministry, Dr. Kevin Harvey, said the donation will help the Ministry to better respond to the demands for treatment of mosquito-borne illnesses, such as Dengue, Chikungunya  and ZikV.

“Pharmaceuticals are a big item in health, and we are fully aware of the importance of having adequate supplies to meet the demand. Paracetamol is used as one of the main symptomatic treatment interventions for not only the Zika Virus, but Chikungunya, Dengue as well as Influenza. Hence, this donation is timely as we are in the flu season,” he said.

Dr. Harvey noted that cases of influenza viruses, including H1N1, are not only circulating in Jamaica, but right across the world. There are nine confirmed cases of H1N1 in Jamaica for this flu season.

He encouraged persons to be “extra careful” during this season, and to ensure that all precautionary measures are observed, such as proper hand washing and proper cough etiquette.

“If persons are feeling ill, they should minimise their contact with others in order to prevent the spread of the flu viruses,” he said.

Symptoms of the virus are similar to influenza and may include sneezing, coughing, runny and stuffy nose, fatigue and headache.

 

In the meantime, Executive Director, FFP Jamaica, David Mair, said the organisation  “is extremely proud” to once again partner with the Ministry  of Health to provide the necessary resources  to reduce the effects of  ZikV.

“With the donation , which was acquired through the head office in Florida, we hope to assist the Health Ministry in its overall preparedness for ZikV and ensure that those who cannot afford the treatment for recovery, will be able to access the necessary medication,” he said.

In 2014 when Chikungunya hit Jamaica, the FFP donated over 5,000 bottles of paracetamol tablets, 3,200 repellents and nine foggers to assist in fighting the disease.eHence this H

ZikV is transmitted by the Aedes aegypti mosquito, which is found in and around areas where people live, work and play. The first case of the virus in Jamaica was confirmed by the Health Ministry in January.

It is from the same family of viruses as Dengue and Chikungunya, and share similar symptoms, which include fever, joint and muscle pain, conjunctivitis, headache, weakness, rash and swelling of the lower limbs.

The illness is usually mild with symptoms lasting from several days to a week.

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