JIS News

Story Highlights

  • Minister of Tourism, Hon. Edmund Bartlett, on Wednesday (June 22), broke ground for the construction of a new ice cream shop at Devon House.
  • The $27-million ice cream parlour, to be situated on the north lawns of the historic site, is slated to be completed by November.
  • The 11-acre property was the home of Jamaica’s first black millionaire, George Stiebel. It was built in 1891, on what was originally 51 acres of land.

Minister of Tourism, Hon. Edmund Bartlett, on Wednesday (June 22), broke ground for the construction of a new ice cream shop at Devon House.

The $27-million ice cream parlour, to be situated on the north lawns of the historic site, is slated to be completed by November.

The project, which is being funded by the Tourism Enhancement Fund (TEF) forms part of ongoing infrastructural upgrading works being undertaken at the heritage site.

Minister Bartlett in his remarks at the ceremony said that the project will enable more visitors and locals to enjoy the iconic Devon House I-Scream.

“Today’s tourism market is driven by experiences and perhaps the most important aspect of that is food. This groundbreaking is for the expansion and creation of an ice cream parlour that is going to bring to the destination, an extended and expanded manufacturing capacity for what is now being referred to as the best ice cream produced anywhere in the western world,” he said.

He informed that an additional $10 million will be earmarked for improvements to the Devon House Mansion and refurbishing of restroom facilities.

To date, the TEF has spent some $100 million on rehabilitation and beautification projects at the celebrated national landmark, including the conversion of the old nursery into a wedding pavilion, installation of lighting, roof repairs and the construction of a perimeter fence.

The Devon House heritage site also houses several shops, a bar and a restaurant showcasing Jamaican cuisine, craft and culture.

The 11-acre property was the home of Jamaica’s first black millionaire, George Stiebel. It was built in 1891, on what was originally 51 acres of land.

The Georgian-style great house is furnished with a collection of 19th-century antiques from Jamaica and the wider Caribbean. In 1990 it became a national monument.

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