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  • Over 80,000 residents of inner-city communities islandwide will benefit from significant provisions under the Government’s $4.63 billion Integrated Community Development Project.
  • The initiative will be financed by a loan from the World Bank.
  • The initiative will involve implementation of enhanced basic infrastructure and social services, and targeted crime and violence reduction interventions, among other inputs.

Over 80,000 residents of inner-city communities islandwide will benefit from significant provisions under the Government’s $4.63 billion (US$42 million) Integrated Community Development Project (ICDP), over the next six years.

The initiative, being financed by a loan from the World Bank, will involve implementation of enhanced basic infrastructure and social services, and targeted crime and violence reduction interventions, among other inputs.

These activities will be carried out in 18 communities in Kingston, St. Andrew, St. Catherine, Clarendon, St. Ann, St. James, and Westmoreland.

The project, being spearheaded by the Jamaica Social Investment Fund (JSIF), is the second phase continuation of the initiative formerly known as the Inner City Basic Services Project (ICBSP), which JSIF rolled out in 12 communities between 2006 and 2013.

The loan agreement was signed during a ceremony at the Finance and Planning Ministry in Kingston, on Tuesday, May 6.

Portfolio Minister, Dr. the Hon. Peter Phillips, and JSIF’s Managing Director, Scarlette Gillings, signed on behalf of the government, while World Bank Caribbean Country Director, Sophie Sirtaine, and Jamaica Country Representative, Giorgio Valentini, signed for the multilateral agency.

Implementation of the Jamaica Integrated Community Development Project will see activities being carried out under four components. These are: basic infrastructure and access to services; public safety enhancement and alternative livelihoods; institutional strengthening for urban management and public safety; and project management.

Activities under the basic infrastructure and access to services component will include: widening, rehabilitating, and paving, existing roads; improving storm water drainage; installing water supply and household sanitation connections; improving electricity connections and lighting; rehabilitating educational facilities; removing zinc fences and replacing these with permanent structures;  constructing mediation centres; and improving communities’ general cleanliness.

Meanwhile, public safety enhancement and alternative livelihoods will support the development and implementation of programmes focusing on key safety concerns and “high risk” groups.

Select government entities that are responsible for urban management will benefit from capacity building inputs under the institutional strengthening for urban management and public safety component.

Under the project management aspect, administrative support will be provided to relevant government agencies, to execute several activities.

These include: undertaking project audits, financial management and procurement requirements, workshops and outreach activities to promote positive environmental and social behaviour; monitoring and evaluating project activities; and providing equipment and training for the Project Implementation Unit.

Other activities include: recruitment of an independent verification agent in relation to the provision of results-based incentives under the project’s first component; providing technical assistance support; implementing crime and violence prevention activities; undertaking environmental and social, financial and procurement management; and financing operating costs.

A statement from the World Bank indicates that the loan is repayable over 29 years, with a five-year grace period.

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