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  • The Government will be accelerating its zinc fence removal programme and regularisation of more communities, says Minister without Portfolio in the Ministry of Economic Growth and Job Creation, Hon. Karl Samuda.
  • The Government will be accelerating its zinc fence removal programme and regularisation of more communities, says Minister without Portfolio in the Ministry of Economic Growth and Job Creation, Hon. Karl Samuda.
  • “I see this effort as a crime-fighting one. Once you improve the environment in which people have to live, they adopt an entirely different approach,” the Minister said.

The Government will be accelerating its zinc fence removal programme and regularisation of more communities, says Minister without Portfolio in the Ministry of Economic Growth and Job Creation, Hon. Karl Samuda.

Mr. Samuda, who was addressing the launch of the Rotary Club of Kingston 2018 Homes for the Homeless Project on November 15, in New Kingston, said upgrading of communities contributes to social stability.

“I see this effort as a crime-fighting one. Once you improve the environment in which people have to live, they adopt an entirely different approach,” the Minister said.

He pointed out that all the zinc fences in targeted communities will be removed, and households will be assisted to have legal water and electricity connections, so that they can pay for what is used in the areas.

Explaining that fences will be replaced with “modest levels of walls”, Mr. Samuda told the audience that with upgrading, these communities can become structured and organised, with street names and numbers.

He commended several private-sector organisations that have provided homes for persons in need.

The Rotary Club of Kingston is on a drive to raise $2.5 million to finance about five houses to be built by Food For the Poor (FFP), and then handed over to the beneficiaries.

Meanwhile, Chairman of FFP, Andrew Mahfood, lauded the Club for continuing to support persons with shelters, noting that there is evidence that children perform better in school when their living conditions are in order.