JIS News

Story Highlights

  • Minister of Health, Hon. Dr. Fenton Ferguson says the Government will continue to implement key strategies that will ultimately result in a 25 per cent reduction in Non- Communicable Diseases (NCDs) by 2025.
  • The plan will serve as a roadmap towards the goal of reducing NCDs, including but not limited to diabetes, cancer, and kidney failure.
  • Dr. Ferguson charged the health professionals to recognise that while they may be facing several challenges, resource optimization is crucial to survival of the sector.

Minister of Health, Hon. Dr. Fenton Ferguson says the Government will continue to implement key strategies that will ultimately result in a 25 per cent reduction in Non-Communicable Diseases (NCDs) by 2025.

“We intend to do everything in our power to meet that target,” the Minister said, while speaking at the re-opening of the Medical Association of Jamaica (MAJ) House, and the launch of the healthy population campaign and symposium at the association’s Windsor Avenue premises in Kingston on June 4.

He noted that projects are being undertaken at the local level to improve services while work is being done with partners at the multilateral and bilateral levels.

He noted that the National Strategic Plan for NCDs will call for co-operation at all levels.  “Therefore we cannot lose sight of value of local partnerships that are allowed to flourish in an atmosphere such as this symposium,” he stated.

The plan will serve as a roadmap towards the goal of reducing NCDs, including but not limited to diabetes, cancer, and kidney failure.

NCDs are the leading cause of death globally, killing more people each year than all other ailments combined. NCDs are responsible for approximately 70 per cent of deaths in Jamaica, and are the leading cause of disability in the population.

In the meantime, he said the Government’s vision for making Jamaica the health hub of the Caribbean and a major player in the Americas will be realised “by building on the solid reputation that Jamaican health professionals have worldwide and strategising for the task of doing more with available resources as we maintain or improve standards of service delivery.”

Highlighting the importance of the symposium, he said participants will get updates on available information on diseases and their management, in addition to emerging trends and related technologies.

“This will definitely feed back into process of analyzing what obtains in the world of medicine and lays the basis for the formulation of strategies and policies…I look forward to the outcome of your deliberations with the hope that we can build on our experiences, embrace the possibilities and increase our knowledge,” he said.

Dr. Ferguson charged the health professionals to recognise that while they may be facing several challenges, resource optimization is crucial to survival of the sector.

Providing details on the activities highlighting the MAJ symposium week, Vice President, MAJ, Professor Marvin Reid said these include sessions and lectures focusing on, among other things, oncology, public health, HIV law and ethics, and will be observed under the theme: “The World of Medicine”.

Also Drs. Hopeton Falconer, Christopher Rose, and Ray Fraser will be honoured for their sterling contribution to medicine and their communities over the years.

In the meantime, he noted that the MAJ’s healthy population campaign initiative, which seeks to reduce health risk behaviours and promote activities that contribute to wellness.

“By doing this we hope to reduce disparities with regards to health care as well as to reduce the burden of some of the most common diseases in Jamaica. For the initial target, we have decided that we would focus on a particular risk factor which is that of obesity,” he said.

He added that obesity contributes significantly to diseases such as cancers, diabetes, hypertension, and other cardiovascular diseases.