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  • The United Nations Population Fund’s (UNFPA) Sub-Regional Office for the Caribbean has developed an Integrated Strategic Framework for the reduction of adolescent pregnancy across the region.
  • Director of the Sub Regional Office, Sheila Roseau, made the disclosure during a Jamaica Information Service Think (JIS) Tank held today (September 25).

The United Nations Population Fund’s (UNFPA) Sub-Regional Office for the Caribbean has developed an Integrated Strategic Framework for the reduction of adolescent pregnancy across the region.

Director of the Sub Regional Office, Sheila Roseau, made the disclosure during a Jamaica Information Service Think (JIS) Tank held today (September 25).
“The goal of this framework is to reduce adolescent pregnancy by 20 per cent by the year 2019. The framework consists of five priority areas with key results,’ she informed.

Miss Roseau said the framework was developed in consultation with CARICOM member states, which recognised the “high prevalence rate of adolescent pregnancy in the region and agreed for something to be done about it.”

“They requested the support of the UNFPA to assist in putting that in place,” she said, adding that numerous regional consultations, including a high level meeting, were held over several months to prepare the document.

“It was a very inclusive participatory process to arrive at the integrated strategic framework for the prevention of adolescent pregnancy,” she noted.  Giving an overview of adolescent pregnancy in the Caribbean, Miss Roseau said that 20 per cent of women in the region have had at least one child by the age of 19, with a considerable percentage of adolescent girls giving birth before the age of 15.

Additionally, she informed that the adolescent birth rate (per 1,000 women aged 15-19) varies across the countries, ranging from 26 out of 1,000 persons in Turks and Caicos to 97 in Guyana.

The UNFPA representative said that one of the key outcomes of the strategic framework is “having access to responsive sexual and reproductive health services, information and commodities.”

“In doing that, it is expected that we would strengthen and increase the availability of youth-friendly, non-judgmental and free from discrimination sexual and reproductive health services for adolescents,” she noted.

These services, she pointed out, should improve and increase the availability and utilisation of information and counselling for adolescents on sexual and reproductive health issues.