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Story Highlights

  • Five more Jamaican teachers are to benefit from training in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) at the Loma Lindo University (LLU) in California this summer.
  • Their participation in the one-week course has been made possible through the Jamaican Diaspora in the United States, in partnership with the Ministries of Education, Science, Technology, Energy and Mining, and Foreign Affairs and Foreign Trade; and the Jamaica Teachers’ Association (JTA).
  • The training programme is in keeping with the Government’s efforts to strengthen teaching and learning in mathematics and science.

Five more Jamaican teachers are to benefit from training in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) at the Loma Lindo University (LLU) in California this summer.

The teachers, who are scheduled to leave the island on July 11 are: Althea McFarlane-Allen from Denham Town High School in Kingston; Donna Reid from the Manchester High School; Phillipa Morris-Grey from Brown’s Town High School in St. Ann; Dennis Clarke from Oracabessa High School in St. Mary; and Lloyd Watson from Morant Bay High School in St. Thomas.

Their participation in the one-week course has been made possible through the Jamaican Diaspora in the United States, in partnership with the Ministries of Education, Science, Technology, Energy and Mining, and Foreign Affairs and Foreign Trade; and the Jamaica Teachers’ Association (JTA).

The training programme is in keeping with the Government’s efforts to strengthen teaching and learning in mathematics and science.

Minister of Science, Technology, Energy and Mining, Hon. Phillip Paulwell, on Friday (July10), presented the teachers with computer tablets to aid with their course- work.

“I am delighted that the Ministry can provide the participating teachers with tablet computers so that they are technologically adept,” he said, at the brief hand-over ceremony held at his Trafalgar Road office.

Althea McFarlane-Allen is expressing gratitude on behalf of the group and “we are so happy for this experience.”

“We will go abroad where we will receive a wealth of knowledge and skills. We know this will benefit our students and we will share it with our colleagues,” she said.

The study programme, which began in 2014, is one of the outcomes from the 2013 Jamaica Diaspora Conference.

The idea is for the participating teachers to return to Jamaica and apply a customised version of the programme at their schools.

Last year, five other teachers benefitted from the very intense, professional enrichment programme offered by the Seventh-day Adventist institution, which is considered to be a top medical research university.

Next year, it is anticipated that the numbers will increase significantly, with 100 teachers to benefit from the scholarship programme.