Feature
Head Girl at the Salvation Army School for the Blind and Visually Impaired, Sarra Lindo (left), speaks with Editor in the Radio Department, Jamaica Information Service, Vaughn Davis, as part of the Studio 58A discussion Programme.

Story Highlights

  • Head Girl at the Salvation Army School for the Blind and Visually Impaired, Sarra Lindo, is not allowing her lack of sight to prevent her from achieving her educational goals.
  • She is presently doing the Caribbean Secondary Education Certificate (CSEC) examinations in eight subjects – Mathematics, English, Social Studies, History, Office Administration, Principles of Business, Visual Arts and Family Resource Management (Home Economics).
  • Speaking on the Jamaica Information Service (JIS) discussion programme, Studio 58A, Ms. Lindo says she has been provided with the necessary support, which has enabled her to fully prepare for her examinations.

Head Girl at the Salvation Army School for the Blind and Visually Impaired, Sarra Lindo, is not allowing her lack of sight to prevent her from achieving her educational goals.

She is presently doing the Caribbean Secondary Education Certificate (CSEC) examinations in eight subjects – Mathematics, English, Social Studies, History, Office Administration, Principles of Business, Visual Arts and Family Resource Management (Home Economics).

Speaking on the Jamaica Information Service (JIS) discussion programme, Studio 58A, Ms. Lindo says she has been provided with the necessary support, which has enabled her to fully prepare for her examinations.

“The teachers read notes for me in class and I will write it in braille, but it is really impossible for them to give me all the information out of the text book. So, most of the times, the teachers will emboss some of the notes in braille,” she points out.

“So, the computer and the braille embosser connect together and it gives me the actual information as what is in the book,” she adds.

A braille embosser is a device that can generate printed material using the braille writing system for blind or visually impaired users. Embossers press dots down on to a piece of paper to let a person using the braille system read by using their fingers.

Additionally, volunteer readers are provided to assist students, by reading from the text books.

Meanwhile, Ms. Lindo is encouraging young persons with disabilities to believe in themselves and have a high self-esteem.

“Try and find someone who has a disability and has been really successful, and try to let that person be your role model. Also, believe in yourself that you can do anything that you want to do,” she encourages.

She is also calling on members of the wider society not to put limits on persons living with a disability.

“With this type of disability, we can do anything we want to do, because it’s just that our eyes are the only thing that is limiting us, but other parts of our bodies are functioning, and we can do things as normal as anybody would do,” Ms. Lindo says.

“Also, as persons who are blind or visually impaired, we can move around without any assistance, once we are trained to do so. A lot of times when we go on the road for mobility classes, persons say the teachers are wicked, as they let the students cross the road themselves. The teachers are just trying to let us be independent, so we don’t have to depend on anyone,” she adds.

In the future, Ms Lindo hopes to read for a degree in Special Education at The Mico University College.

The Salvation Army School for the Blind and Visually Impaired, which is situated at 57 Manning’s Hill Road in St Andrew, has been providing quality education for some of the most vulnerable Jamaicans since 1927.

Students who attend are classified as having low vision or totally blind.