• Feature

    Story Highlights

    • The Reverend Dr. Barrington Cromwell Buchanan has been conferred with the Prime Minister’s Medal of Appreciation for Service to Education for 50 years.
    • He tells JIS News that he started out teaching English and history in 1968 and went on to serve as principal for 20 years, at the Black River High School in St. Elizabeth.
    • He attributes his longevity in the vocation to the word of God, specifically Matthew 28:19, and the joy he feels when his students do well and develop into productive citizens of the country.

    The Reverend Dr. Barrington Cromwell Buchanan has been conferred with the Prime Minister’s Medal of Appreciation for Service to Education for 50 years.

    He tells JIS News that he started out teaching English and history in 1968 and went on to serve as principal for 20 years, at the Black River High School in St. Elizabeth.

    He attributes his longevity in the vocation to the word of God, specifically Matthew 28:19, and the joy he feels when his students do well and develop into productive citizens of the country.

    “Jesus in one of his last sermons told his disciples to ‘go ye, therefore, and teach all nations, no matter who they are’. I loved what I was doing, so it didn’t feel like work,” he says.

    “I glory in seeing my students achieve and become contributing members to the community/society,” he adds.

    The construction of the Black River High School, as well as the fencing of the compound, was done under the aegis of the distinguished honouree.

    “Well, I am not the one who did it; it’s the people who came together and had it done. I just provided the inspiration,” Dr. Buchanan shares.

    “It was a huge undertaking; no individual could have done it alone,” he adds.

    Evidently, his work has not gone unnoticed as it was his friends and co-workers who submitted his name for consideration for the Prime Minister’s award.

    His family, friends and former colleagues are relishing the occasion with him. “They are very proud,” he says.

    Meanwhile, Dr. Buchanan is encouraging educators to “continue working in this noble field”.

    “You are not going to be the richest persons in Jamaica but you can live comfortably,” he notes.

    Though retired from the post of principal, Dr. Buchanan continues to work in the education system on school boards. Moreover, he has not given up teaching but he now devotes more of his time to imparting spiritual lessons.

    Dr. Buchanan is from a family of educators. Two of his cousins were headmasters, but he is the first to receive this prestigious award from the Prime Minister.

    On Wednesday, June 26, he, along with 39 other educators, will be honoured during a ceremony to take place on the lawns of Jamaica House.