• Feature
    Members of the fledgling business entity, Those Creative People Tings (from left): Partner and Director of Operations – Marc Gayle; Co-Founder/Creative Director/Writer – Kia Moses; Creative Coordinator and Copywriter – Lindsey Lodenquai; and Co-Founder/Creative Director/Graphic Designer – Jordan Moses.
    Photo: Contributed

    Story Highlights

    • A group of enterprising young entrepreneurs has been gearing up to fill the void anticipated from the impending Government ban on single-use plastic items, which is slated to take effect on January 1, 2019.
    • The operators of the fledgling business entity, Those Creative People Tings (TCP Tings), which is known for its signature line – ‘One Bag Ah Tings, have created stylish tote bags to replace plastic or ‘scandal’ bags, commonly used by shoppers.
    • The bags, which were launched recently, are being marketed under the company’s ‘Scandal-Free’ line, and provide consumers with a trendy and durable alternative to scandal bags.

    A group of enterprising young entrepreneurs has been gearing up to fill the void anticipated from the impending Government ban on single-use plastic items, which is slated to take effect on January 1, 2019.

    The operators of the fledgling business entity, Those Creative People Tings (TCP Tings), which is known for its signature line – ‘One Bag Ah Tings, have created stylish tote bags to replace plastic or ‘scandal’ bags, commonly used by shoppers.

    The bags, which were launched recently, are being marketed under the company’s ‘Scandal-Free’ line, and provide consumers with a trendy and durable alternative to scandal bags.

    They sport a range of interesting branding depictions, which is anticipated will serve to bolster the Government’s drive to withdraw plastic bags from the market.

    These include: ‘Nuh Inna Di Scandal’, ‘Scandal Free Life’, and ‘Not Ah Scandal Bag’.

    The dynamic four-member team, whose products can be viewed and purchased on their website – www.tcptings.com – comprises: Founders and Creative Directors, Kia Moses and Jordan Moses; Creative Coordinator and Copywriter, Lindsey Lodenquai; and Partner and Director of Operations, Marc Gayle.

    Mr. Gayle says the ‘scandal-free’ bag line has received positive public feedback, citing a recently held Moda Market in Kingston where the product was introduced, among the testing grounds.

    “We tested it there and the reaction was crazy, we were completely sold out on the first run. We have customers begging for more bags. We have received great feedback from our customers that our totes are durable and can hold a [fairly sizeable] amount of things,” Mr. Gayle tells JIS News.

    He says team has taken steps to ensure that none of the company’s products negatively impact the environment, noting that the members are environmentally conscious, which influences their operations.

    “We do what we can and, as we grow, we’d like to do a lot more. Part of our proceeds from the sale of our classic totes collection is donated to the ongoing ‘Nuh Dutty Up Jamaica’ campaign,” Mr. Gayle informs.

    He further indicates that the company tries to exercise its environmental responsibilities by limiting the use of plastic in its production process.

    “One of the things that we’ve debated amongst ourselves is not using plastic in our packaging. So we decided, early, to use cloth strings and paper tags to label our bags as well as package them in paper bags,” Mr. Gayle outlines.

    While acknowledging that this is costlier and more labour intensive, he says this, nonetheless, upholds the principle of their products being environmentally friendly.

    “We are extremely supportive of the proactive measure the Government is taking to put our environment first and steer the country towards a more sustainable future,” he adds.

    Mr. Gayle says the group is concerned about the extent of pollution caused by plastics, and how some persons in the society have become lackadaisical in their approach to solid waste disposal, particularly plastics.

    “As a small island, we are threatened by man-made single-use plastic containers. This threatens our fisheries, the livelihood of fishermen and the blue economy,” he shares.

    The group is hopeful that once the plastic ban is implemented, the market will realign and raw materials to produce alternatives will be widely accessible locally at competitive prices.

    Mr. Gayle says the company remains committed to being environmentally conscious and eco-friendly and, in that regard, plans to extensively expand its product line over the next five years.

    They also commend the Government and encourage other businesses to embrace and capitalise on the changes and opportunities that the ban generate.

    “We’re deeply sympathetic towards businesses whose operations will be affected by the ban. However, change is coming with the new legislation so don’t be closed minded. Keep your eyes open and look at alternatives because even if you don’t see them today, you’re going to see a lot more of them in the coming years,” Mr. Gayle states.

    He also encourages the Government to heighten its responsiveness to and prioritisation of environmental preservation, while incorporating wide-scale stakeholder involvement in the process.