JIS News

Story Highlights

  • Governor-General, His Excellency the Most Hon. Sir Patrick Allen, is encouraging farmers to learn more about the effects of climate change on agriculture, as they are inextricably linked.
  • Delivering the main address at the 67th annual Denbigh Agricultural, Industrial and Food Show, held at the Denbigh Showgrounds in Clarendon, on Sunday, August 4, the Governor-General emphasised that farming decisions have to be made with climate change in mind, because if this is ignored, “it will be to our detriment.”
  • “Jamaica is one of the top 40 climatic hotspots, which means that we are one of the countries in the world that have already been or will be affected by climate change. The experts tell us that drought conditions have been occurring more frequently worldwide because of the effects of global warming,” he noted.

Governor-General, His Excellency the Most Hon. Sir Patrick Allen, is encouraging farmers to learn more about the effects of climate change on agriculture, as they are inextricably linked.

Delivering the main address at the 67th annual Denbigh Agricultural, Industrial and Food Show, held at the Denbigh Showgrounds in Clarendon, on Sunday, August 4, the Governor-General emphasised that farming decisions have to be made with climate change in mind, because if this is ignored, “it will be to our detriment.”

“Jamaica is one of the top 40 climatic hotspots, which means that we are one of the countries in the world that have already been or will be affected by climate change. The experts tell us that drought conditions have been occurring more frequently worldwide because of the effects of global warming,” he noted.

The Governor-General said that drought conditions in many parts of the island, irregular rainfall patterns and record-breaking high temperatures, among other climatic conditions experienced by Jamaica since the start of the year, will have a direct impact on food security, agricultural sustainability and other farming decisions.

“The Caribbean region as a whole is vulnerable to climate change and we should not be caught off guard, but we must prepare and adapt ourselves to deal with these challenging times. In this sector we have no option but to prepare for flood, drought, praedial larceny, high and low temperatures, and hurricanes,” he said.

Meanwhile, President of the Jamaica Agricultural Society (JAS), Lenworth Fulton, underscored the Society’s annual financial struggle to stage the much-anticipated show.

He noted that although the Ministry of Industry, Commerce, Agriculture and Fisheries helps, more budgetary support is needed to enhance the show’s quality.

“The shows are for the Jamaican people who are supporters of the JAS and its farmers and we urge all agencies, such as RADA, the 4-H Clubs and the Social Development Commission (SDC), to continue to do their best to showcase the best of Jamaica and agriculture at these shows,” Mr. Fulton said.

Giving support to the show, which ends on August 6, are: Hi-Pro, Delta Supply Company, Jamaica Broilers Group, Tourism Linkages Network, RADA, Jamaica 4-H Clubs, Digicel, Newport Fersan and others.