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  • The TTMS is a centralised web-based platform, designed to improve traffic ticket management from the point of issuance to either the payment of fines at tax offices or adjudication in court.
  • “Motorists, therefore, will be held accountable for their traffic infractions and the police will impose the appropriate punitive sanctions, where applicable. Without this, we can’t have public order,” he said.
  • “I am looking forward to the improved software to further streamline the operations of the TTMS that will also generate traffic warrants electronically, thereby reducing the amount of time spent by the staff preparing them,” he said.

The Ministry of National Security, on Friday (December 13), handed over equipment to the Court Management Services as part of measures to further streamline the Traffic Ticket Management System (TTMS).

The provision includes: 13 laptop and three desktop computers, and three printers.

The TTMS is a centralised web-based platform, designed to improve traffic ticket management from the point of issuance to either the payment of fines at tax offices or adjudication in court.

Speaking at the handing over ceremony at the Supreme Court in downtown Kingston, National Security Minister, Hon. Dr. Horace Chang, said the equipment will assist the courts to readily access information on matters being adjudicated.

He said the system’s implementation is aimed at improving efficiency and effectiveness in the enforcement of the road traffic rules while restoring law and order.

The Minister anticipates that this will have a positive impact in resetting Jamaica’s public order, road safety and traffic law enforcement.

“The process of just ensuring that we have an efficient ticket management system that can hold individuals accountable, is quite a complex one.

But it is a very important one because discipline on our roads and restoring and maintaining public order on the streets of Jamaica are critical [to the] safety and security of our citizens,” he said.

Dr. Chang noted that the need for constant information sharing among the relevant agencies is critical in the effective management of the system.

“If we get the system working properly and we can hold them [offenders] accountable and it is done fairly and justly, we will have order; I am convinced we can see dramatic changes in public order very quickly. But the issue is to get it done efficiently and fairly so [that] when a ticket is written, it is written for everybody,” the Minister added.

Dr. Chang said the Ministry will continue to collaborate with the Court Management Services in order to combat indiscipline on roads and improve enforcement of the law.

He added that the agencies involved in the Traffic Ticket Management System are collaborating to build-out the most efficient and effective system possible.

“Motorists, therefore, will be held accountable for their traffic infractions and the police will impose the appropriate punitive sanctions, where applicable. Without this, we can’t have public order,” he said.

In his remarks, Justice Minister, Hon. Delroy Chuck, said the technology will assist in bringing order and discipline to the nation’s roads.

“There is too much disorder on the roads, and those who are engaged in the disorder are taking advantage of an inefficient manual system. To the extent that we can use technology, not only to ensure that those who breach the law are brought to justice, [but that they] pay their fines and [that] those who consistently breach the road code, we remove them from the roads, at least for some time, [will redound to Jamaica’s long-term benefit],” he said.

Chief Justice, Hon. Bryan Sykes, said the equipment will not only bolster the capabilities of the TTMS, but also assist the courts in being efficient in the management of traffic tickets.

“I am looking forward to the improved software to further streamline the operations of the TTMS that will also generate traffic warrants electronically, thereby reducing the amount of time spent by the staff preparing them,” he said.

Mr. Sykes emphasized that the training of the staff is also important to ensure the system works, and that the benefits to be derived are attained, “because, as we all know, technology by itself does not produce the results; it is the technology combined with the human component”.

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