JIS News

Story Highlights

  • The Government has developed an electronic warrant module for traffic violations, which is expected to be rolled out shortly.
  • The module was developed in partnership with several entities, including e-Gov Jamaica, traffic ticketing stakeholders, the Ministry of National Security, and the Court Management Services.
  • It aims to improve effectiveness, while making enforcement of the road traffic rules more efficient. Prior to the full roll-out, a pilot will be undertaken in four courts across the island.

The Government has developed an electronic warrant module for traffic violations, which is expected to be rolled out shortly.

The module was developed in partnership with several entities, including e-Gov Jamaica, traffic ticketing stakeholders, the Ministry of National Security, and the Court Management Services.

It aims to improve effectiveness, while making enforcement of the road traffic rules more efficient. Prior to the full roll-out, a pilot will be undertaken in four courts across the island.

During a meeting with stakeholders on the Traffic Ticket Management System, at the Ministry of National Security in Kingston on September 12, Minister, Dr. Horace Chang, lauded the initiative, noting that it will significantly improve the traffic ticket management system and reduce the amount of time consumed in preparing warrants for traffic violators.

Providing more information on the module, Senior Director, Technology Transformation, Ministry of National Security, Arvel Grant, said the software development is approximately 95 per cent complete.

“We are doing training and sensitisation next week. Following that, we will schedule with the respective courts when they will start using the electronic system,” he said, adding that the training will be undertaken with court administrators and other persons within the justice system.

Mr. Grant said the initiative aims to improve the sector, pointing out that the issuing of warrants in the courts was primarily a handwritten manual process.

“In the case where you may have thousands of matters before the courts each day, you have maybe a couple of hundred persons who will attend court, and then for the remainder, warrants will have to be issued. Now, where you have thousands of warrants to be issued each day, it is inefficient to have persons in the courts writing up the warrants by hand,” he argued.