JIS News

Story Highlights

  • The Ministry of Education continues to provide intervention support for the administrators of schools, to assist them to better manage challenges involving students displaying indifferent and negative behaviour.
  • Included in the support are activities coordinated by the School Safety and Security Division; programmes administered through the Guidance and Counselling Unit.
  • Some 100 principals, teachers, and administrators from preparatory, primary and secondary schools across Kingston and St. Andrew, comprising the Ministry’s Region One, attended the forum, which was held under the theme: ‘Student Behaviour and Welfare: Emerging Challenges and Opportunities’.

Senior Education Officer in charge of Guidance and Counselling, Antoinette Brooks, says the Ministry of Education continues to provide intervention support for the administrators of schools, to assist them to better manage challenges involving students displaying indifferent and negative behaviour.

Included in the support, she noted, are activities coordinated by the School Safety and Security Division; programmes administered through the Guidance and Counselling Unit; the appointment of Deans of Discipline at secondary institutions, as well as Special Needs Coordinators and Regional Educational Social Workers, “who work with the individual schools to treat with the needs of students.”

Ms. Brooks was speaking at the Ministry’s Region One Principals’ Consultation, held at St. George’s College, in Kingston, on October 14.

Noting that principals and other administrators often indicate that they are “overwhelmed” by issues arising from students’ behavioural indifference, Ms. Brooks said these situations are often attributable to factors at the home, in the communities, “and what’s going on with the children…developmentally and physically.”

“Our focus, therefore, is on making our students the best they can be. As such, our hope is that we will be empowered to pull our teams together, so that we can work with our students and (their) families, to make Jamaica a better place,” Ms. Brooks said.

For his part, Director of Campus Ministry at St. George’s College, Alphonso Christie, who represented host principal, Margaret Campbell, also underscored the need for administrators at the various institutions to “work together to find solutions to the many problems that we face as schools (and) a community.”

The consultation formed part of the Ministry’s ongoing sensitisation of school administrators about student behavioural indifference, and interventions to address this issue.

Some 100 principals, teachers, and administrators from preparatory, primary and secondary schools across Kingston and St. Andrew, comprising the Ministry’s Region One, attended the forum, which was held under the theme: ‘Student Behaviour and Welfare: Emerging Challenges and Opportunities’.

The meeting featured presentations on a wide range of issues, including: human trafficking; lottery scamming; amendments to the Dangerous Drugs Act; suicide prevention; and bullying in schools.

Among the presenters were: Chairperson, National Task Force Against Trafficking in Persons and Permanent Secretary, Ministry of Justice, Carol Palmer; Research and Development Manager, Child Development Agency (CDA), Randell Bailey; National Council on Drug Abuse Regional Manager, O’Neil Smith; Founder and President, Choose Life International, Dr. Donovan Thomas; and Major Organised Crime and Anti-Corruption Agency (MOCA) officer, Detective Inspector Coralee Brown Fowler.