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  • Director of Public Prosecutions (DPP), Paula Llewellyn, says her office is within its rights to refrain from continuing with a case if the evidence is deemed insufficient and weak.
  • Ms. Llewellyn pointed out that whenever recommendations are made to the DPP’s office they are carefully studied before a determination is made as to whether or not a case should be prosecuted.
  • The DPP pointed out that in the event she has made a decision that the aggrieved party is not in agreement with, then the option to ask for a Judicial Review is always on the table.

Director of Public Prosecutions (DPP), Paula Llewellyn, says her office is within its rights to refrain from continuing with a case if the evidence is deemed insufficient and weak.

According to Ms. Llewellyn, she feels a lot more comfortable adhering to the letter of the law as opposed to pandering to sentiments or making decisions that could come back to haunt her.

The DDP was addressing a recent awards ceremony to recognize several Justices of the Peace for their long and outstanding service to Trelawny, at the New Testament Church of God in Clark’s Town.

“There have been many nights when I am at my office thinking about a particular decision I have to make. We need to understand that sometimes a decision to act can carry the same consequences as a decision to refrain from acting,” she said.

Ms. Llewellyn pointed out that whenever recommendations are made to the DPP’s office they are carefully studied before a determination is made as to whether or not a case should be prosecuted.

“Sometimes matters are referred to me in order to take action. However, if I do my research and I find that it is not the way to go, then under the Constitution I can refrain from acting,” she explained.

The DPP said she is not perturbed by criticism and that as long as she is comfortable with the knowledge that the public good is being served, “then my back is broad enough to take whatever comes my way.”

Ms. Llewellyn acknowledged that as a figure in the public eye, “giving service above self,” she has a responsibility to accept and embrace the fact that it is the right of everyone to offer criticism.

“Sometimes it is constructive, sometimes it is destructive. I am however encouraged by the public support I get whenever I go to functions around the country, with persons telling me not to be deterred in carrying out my duties in a climate of transparency and accountability,” she said.

The DPP pointed out that in the event she has made a decision that the aggrieved party is not in agreement with, then the option to ask for a Judicial Review is always on the table.

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