Do What Is Right For Jamaica – GG

Photo: Glenis Rose Governor General, His Excellency the Most Hon. Sir Patrick Allen (2nd right), is greeted by Priest Rudolph Bailey of the Rastafari community, as he arrived at the Ocho Rios Baptist Church in St. Ann on December 13, for the 23rd Annual National Prayer Vigil under the theme: ‘Justice, Unity, Peace and Healing’.

Story Highlights

  • Governor-General, His Excellency the Most Hon. Sir Patrick Allen, has called on Jamaicans to “do what is right” for the country.
  • He made the appeal as he addressed hundreds of persons gathered at the Ocho Rios Baptist Church in St. Ann on Monday, December 13, for the Annual National Prayer Vigil under the theme: ‘Justice, Peace, Unity and Healing’.
  • Sir Patrick, who is Patron of the Annual National Prayer Vigil, reiterated his stance that “there’s nothing wrong with Jamaica that cannot be fixed by what is right with Jamaica.”

Governor-General, His Excellency the Most Hon. Sir Patrick Allen, has called on Jamaicans to “do what is right” for the country.

He made the appeal as he addressed hundreds of persons gathered at the Ocho Rios Baptist Church in St. Ann on Monday, December 13, for the Annual National Prayer Vigil under the theme: ‘Justice, Peace, Unity and Healing’.

Sir Patrick, who is Patron of the Annual National Prayer Vigil, reiterated his stance that “there’s nothing wrong with Jamaica that cannot be fixed by what is right with Jamaica.”

“Therefore, to achieve what is right, we must not allow our dogmas, our creed, our associations, our politics, our statutes or anything else to divide us as a people.  I therefore say to us all, let’s get together and do what’s right for Jamaica,” he said.

The Governor-General, in endorsing the theme for the vigil, said it is imperative that all Jamaicans adopt these principles “if we are to proceed and give meaning to our pledge to make Jamaica ‘play her part in advancing the welfare of the whole human race’.”

He further appealed to the church community to become advocates and mentors for the marginalised, the helpless and the hopeless in the society.

“This work that we must do for Jamaica and for our people is not only within the walls of the church but outside.  We must therefore go where people are hurting on the back roads of Jamaica…and within our communities,” he said.

“It is my sincere wish that we will …find the strength and the courage to labour tediously in the shadows among the abused, the victims, the sick, the hungry, the jobless, the burdened, the lonely and the stressed, working as supports, prayer partners and friends,” he added.

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