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  • There has been a decrease in mosquito breeding sites in the parish of Trelawny, says Chief Medical Officer at the Falmouth Hospital, Dr. Diane Dale.
  • She added that there are still at-risk communities in the parish that the department continues to monitor, and that the department continues to educate residents in the parish about dengue-prevention methods.
  • The Aedes aegypti mosquito is responsible for transmitting the dengue, Zika and chikungunya viruses.

There has been a decrease in mosquito breeding sites in the parish of Trelawny, says Chief Medical Officer at the Falmouth Hospital, Dr. Diane Dale.

She told JIS News that the decline is attributed to extensive mosquito control activities done by the Trelawny Health Department since a dengue fever outbreak was declared in January of this year.

“We intensified mosquito control activities right across the parish. This was facilitated with some additional resources that would have strengthened our mosquito control actions, by virtue of having temporary vector control workers,  additional transportation (for the workers) as well as contracting private pest control operators that would have assisted with fogging activities,” Dr. Dale said.

She added that there are still at-risk communities in the parish that the department continues to monitor, and that the department continues to educate residents in the parish about dengue-prevention methods.

“Healthcare workers continue to sensitise persons across the parish as it relates to the Aedes aegypti mosquito, preventing mosquito breeding and the risks that come with dengue fever,” Dr. Dale informed.

She also noted that continuous health education is a key aspect of the department’s efforts, as many of the residents are fully aware of what prevention methods to employ.

“Health education activities would have been heightened over the last three months, but it is important to note that, generally, the knowledge (among residents) is quite high, and the feedback from some of the citizens with whom the staff interact on a daily basis confirms that they are aware of the breeding sites, they know what is to be done to prevent mosquito breeding, and they know about the risk of the disease,” Dr. Dale said.

The Aedes aegypti mosquito is responsible for transmitting the dengue, Zika and chikungunya viruses.