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    • Industry, Investment, and Commerce Minister, Hon. Anthony Hylton, says the importation of damaged motor vehicles has been identified as a potential area for job creation and increased business development that would positively impact Jamaica’s economy
    • Mr. Hylton said reexamination of the ban to determine if it should be lifted resulted from representation made by stakeholders to this effect, as well as recognition of the positive impact damaged motor vehicle importation could have on Jamaica’s logistics-centred economy.
    • Mr. Hylton pointed out that similar to how the Revised Motor Vehicle Import Policy’s provisions facilitate predictability, fairness, and transparency within a regulatory framework, so does the Damaged Motor Import Vehicle Policy via specific and selective policy guidelines.

    Industry, Investment, and Commerce Minister, Hon. Anthony Hylton, says the importation of damaged motor vehicles has been identified as a potential area for job creation and increased business development that would positively impact Jamaica’s economy.

    This engagement, he adds, would also go a far way to assist in better positioning Jamaica to become the fourth Global Logistics Hub.

    “Jamaica is already the major transshipment port in the Caribbean, and this will be used to our benefit through the creation of the special economic zones (SEZs) which will be a vehicle for establishing the facilities in which repairs to imported damaged vehicles will be conducted, depending on the scale and scope of the investment,” he states.

    The Minister made his remarks while speaking at the Trade Board’s second imported damaged vehicles stakeholders’ consultation meeting at the Ministry of Industry, Investment, and Commerce, New Kingston, on Friday, December 5.

    The meeting is consistent with the mandate of the Special Task Force established to examine the current ban on the importation of damaged motor vehicles.

    Mr. Hylton said reexamination of the ban to determine if it should be lifted resulted from representation made by stakeholders to this effect, as well as recognition of the positive impact damaged motor vehicle importation could have on Jamaica’s logistics-centred economy.

    The Minister advised that several areas have been identified to which attention is expected to be given. These include: determining the likely positive or negative consequences; outlining a set of strategies and best practices that would lay the foundation for lifting the ban, with due consideration to the concerns of different interest groups; and addressing any deficiencies associated with the previous regime.

    He said several accruable positive factors that will also be considered include: the potential for increased revenues; employment creation in industries associated with motor vehicles repairs and detailing; improved welfare effects through increased affordability of motor vehicles; expansion in real value added for the industry’s wholesale and retail trade; and repairs and installation of machinery, with respect to higher sales of motor vehicle parts and other supplies.

    Mr. Hylton pointed out that similar to how the Revised Motor Vehicle Import Policy’s provisions facilitate predictability, fairness, and transparency within a regulatory framework, so does the Damaged Motor Import Vehicle Policy via specific and selective policy guidelines.

    The latter, he outlined, places emphasis on: road safety; consumer protection and consumer choice; competition law and policy; revenue protection and collection; and environmental protection, among other provisions.

    While the meeting’s participants made several suggestions in relation to damaged motor vehicle importation, they were invited to submit written proposals to the Trade Board, to enable their formulation and presentation to the Industry, Investment, and Commerce Ministry, early in 2015.

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