JIS News

Story Highlights

  • Some 230 newly minted police constables, who have benefitted from diversity training, are being urged to use the knowledge gained to make a difference in how they relate to the Jamaican public.
  • The training was conducted under the Culture of Lawfulness component of the Community Empowerment and Transformation (COMET) Phase Two, a project of the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) in collaboration with the Jamaica Constabulary Force (JCF).
  • The objectives of COMET II are to strengthen community and civil society organisations, develop long-term champions supportive of the rule of law, support programmes for at-risk youth and consolidate community-based policing.

Some 230 newly minted police constables, who have benefitted from diversity training, are being urged to use the knowledge gained to make a difference in how they relate to the Jamaican public.

“I am going to ask you to go out there and make a difference… in how you speak to persons,” advised Deputy Commissioner of Police (DCP) in charge of Operations, Clifford Blake.

“If you see your colleague doing something wrong, regardless of rank, regardless of service, just say to the person, I think you could have done this differently,” he urged the participants.

He was addressing the closing ceremony held on October 14 at the Police Officers Club, St. Andrew, where the participants were presented with certificates.

The two-day training sessions were held in the JCF’s five area divisions over the course of September and focused on the safety and security of women and girls, persons living with disabilities, marginalised youth, and members of the lesbian, gay, bisexual or Transgendered (LGBT) community.

The training was conducted under the Culture of Lawfulness component of the Community Empowerment and Transformation (COMET) Phase Two, a project of the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) in collaboration with the Jamaica Constabulary Force (JCF).

The specific objectives of the training were: to increase awareness of the participants to the nuances of the diverse groups in society; create a better understanding of the safety and security issues and challenges facing these groups; increase the capacity to develop interventions that are inclusive or are specific to the needs of the diverse groups; and enable participants to maintain professionalism in the discharge of duties.

The training, which included interaction with representatives of the various groups, was in support of the strategic objectives of the JCF of upholding human rights and restoring public trust and confidence.

DCP Blake said the course was developed out of recognition of the value of impacting the mindset of persons just coming into the organisation, and as such, will be offered to upcoming batches of recruits.

Mission Director of the USAID, Denise Herbol, said the experience is an investment in the growth of the country’s law enforcement personnel, noting that the returns from the training should manifest in the improved delivery of service to the Jamaican people.

“All of you have had training that can help you to turn things around in your communities (and) in your interactions with the people you work with every day,” she said.

“In executing your duties, you should now be more aware of the needs of all vulnerable groups across the island and treat each person with dignity and respect,”

Ms. Herbol noted.

The objectives of COMET II are to strengthen community and civil society organisations, develop long-term champions supportive of the rule of law, support programmes for at-risk youth and consolidate community-based policing.