JIS News

Story Highlights

  • Justice Minister, Hon. Delroy Chuck, signed three contracts totalling $38.73 million to undertake remedial work to buildings and other structures with a view to improving the quality of service offered by the justice system.
  • Of the amount, $6.28 million will be used to facilitate repairs to the St. James Parish Court in Montego Bay; $17.35 million for partial refurbishing works at the Criminal Division of the Half-Way Tree Parish Court; and $15.1 million for improvements to the wall and paving of the car park at East Street in downtown, Kingston, which serves the Civil Division of the Kingston and St. Andrew Parish Court.
  • Mr. Chuck assured that the Ministry is doing everything to ensure that court facilities are attractive to court staff, judges and members of the public.

Justice Minister, Hon. Delroy Chuck, signed three contracts totalling $38.73 million to undertake remedial work to buildings and other structures with a view to improving the quality of service offered by the justice system.

Of the amount, $6.28 million will be used to facilitate repairs to the St. James Parish Court in Montego Bay; $17.35 million for partial refurbishing works at the Criminal Division of the Half-Way Tree Parish Court; and $15.1 million for improvements to the wall and paving of the car park at East Street in downtown, Kingston, which serves the Civil Division of the Kingston and St. Andrew Parish Court.

Minister Chuck said the signing of the contracts represents another push to move the justice system forward.

“There can be no doubt that the commitment to transform the justice system in Jamaica is quite evident,” he said.

Mr. Chuck was speaking at the signing ceremony at the Ministry’s Constant Spring headquarters on November 8.

He noted that since 2010, more than $1 billion has been spent to refurbish and improve a number of courthouses across the island.

Remedial works have been undertaken at Justice Square in downtown, Kingston, the St. Ann’s Bay and Port Antonio courthouses, the Family Court in Montego Bay, among others.

“We have also restored several restorative justice centres in Savanna-la-Mar in Westmoreland; May Pen in Clarendon and Spanish Town in St. Catherine, and shortly in Granville, Montego Bay,” he indicated.

Mr. Chuck assured that the Ministry is doing everything to ensure that court facilities are attractive to court staff, judges and members of the public.

He indicated that an assessment will be conducted in short order to determine which other courts need repairs, air-conditioning and equipment.

“We are providing 14 photocopiers to each of the parish courthouses and we’re providing over 85 computers right across various courts. I will be personally ensuring that our courts have air-conditioning and that they are maintained on a regular basis,” Mr. Chuck said.

Meanwhile, Permanent Secretary in the Ministry, Carol Palmer, urged the contractors to see themselves as partners in the justice system.

She said that they have an obligation to execute the works on time and within budget.

“When the story of the justice system is written you must be able to say with pride that you made your contribution. You are (also) users of the system, so there is a personal benefit to be gained from using quality material and achieving a professional finish,” she pointed out.

Mrs. Palmer assured that the Government is doing its part to improve the justice system through several projects.

These include the Citizen Security and Justice Project where US$12 million is being spent; the Justice Undertakings for Social Transformation Programme, where CDN$20 million is being spent; and the Justice, Security, Accountability and Transparency programme, where €3.54 million is being expended.