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  • Consumers are being urged to pay their water bills and to report leaking water mains, by calling the National Water Commission (NWC) Leak Hotline.
  • The call came from Minister of Water, Land, Environment and Climate Change, Hon. Robert Pickersgill, at the commissioning of the $59.6 million Burnt Savannah/Knoxwood Water Supply System, in Burnt Savannah, St. Elizabeth, on October 30.
  • Mr. Pickersgill said that providing and distributing water to customers of the NWC is by no means a cheap process.

Consumers are being urged to pay their water bills and to report leaking water mains, by calling the National Water Commission (NWC) Leak Hotline.

The call came from Minister of Water, Land, Environment and Climate Change, Hon. Robert Pickersgill, at the commissioning of the $59.6 million Burnt Savannah/Knoxwood Water Supply System, in Burnt Savannah, St. Elizabeth, on October 30.

Mr. Pickersgill said that providing and distributing water to customers of the NWC is by no means a cheap process.

“In fact, it will cost the NWC $500,000 per month or $6 million per year to pump and distribute water to the beneficiaries of this project (Burnt Savannah), so if you expect to receive water, then you will have to pay your bills,” the Minister told the residents.

Meanwhile, Mr. Pickersgill said every effort is being made to reduce or eliminate Non Revenue Water (NRW) through leaks and theft, which often affect the delivery of water to residents.

“The focus on reducing NRW is critical at all times, but especially during periods of prolonged drought when we can ill afford to lose even one drop of the precious commodity.  The situation with our NRW, not just here in St. Elizabeth but elsewhere in the island, cannot and must not continue,” the Minister said.

Mr. Pickergsill said the country must take note of the prediction by the 2006 United Nations Human Development Report that more and more regions will be so impacted by climate change and population growth, that approximately half the world will be affected by water scarcity over the next few decades.

“Here in Jamaica, we must heed the warning signs which are evident in the lengthy droughts that have been plaguing the island in recent years,” the Minister urged.

He noted that one of the methods by which Jamaica can ensure its water security in the face of growing climate change impact, is a return to rainwater harvesting.

“I have spoken on many occasions advocating for a return to rainwater harvesting as one modality of augmenting our existing water supplies.  I appeal to all stakeholders, all Jamaicans to ensure that we utilize our precious water resources in a sustainable manner,” the Minister said.

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