Computer Hackers Warned


The Broadcasting Commission of Jamaica (BCJ) is reminding Jamaicans that the hacking of data from a computer or telephone is against the law and persons caught engaged in such illegal activity could be charged under the Cyber Crime Act 2010.

The warning came from Assistant Executive Director of the BCJ, Karlene Salmon Johnson, as she addressed grade six students of the Mona Primary School in Kingston on Thursday, March 14, as part of the organisation’s ongoing media literacy project.

[RELATED: Students Warned to Watch what they Post Online]

She said the law provides sanctions for the misuse of computer systems or data and facilitates the investigation and prosecution of such crimes.

“So, if you are caught, you can be arrested and tried in court and if found guilty you can be sent to prison,” she said.

She advised the students to protect the passwords for their Facebook and email accounts to prevent hackers from accessing their personal and private information.

Responding to a question about the regulation of music on buses, Mrs. Johnson said that the BCJ has no control over music played at dances, parties, or on the buses.

She informed the students that the BCJ is responsible for the licensing of radio, television and cable companies in Jamaica.

“Once you get that licence, you are required to obey certain rules, regulations and we monitor the radio, television and cable companies to make sure that they obey those rules and regulations,” she stated.

According to the Assistant Director, there are 27 free-to-air radio stations that transmit over the airwaves, three free-to-air television stations, and 41 cable companies across Jamaica.

Vice Principal of Mona Primary School, Bishon Maragh, said she was pleased with the participation of the students, who are preparing for the Grade Six Achievement Test (GSAT).

“I think it was very informative and from how the children responded, I see that it meant much to them. The questions were quite intelligent,” she told JIS News.

She said the students attend computer classes at least four times per week for about an hour.

By E. Hartman Reckord, JIS Reporter

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